Hide vs Flesh - What's the difference?

hide | flesh |


In lang=en terms the difference between hide and flesh

is that hide is to put oneself in a place where one will be harder to find or out of sight while flesh is to bury (something, especially a weapon) in flesh.

As verbs the difference between hide and flesh

is that hide is to put (something) in a place where it will be harder to discover or out of sight or hide can be to beat with a whip made from hide while flesh is to bury (something, especially a weapon) in flesh.

As nouns the difference between hide and flesh

is that hide is (countable) (mainly british) a covered structure from which hunters, birdwatchers, etc can observe animals without scaring them or hide can be (countable) the skin of an animal or hide can be a medieval land measure equal to the amount of land that could sustain one free family; usually 100 acres forty hides equalled a barony while flesh is the soft tissue of the body, especially muscle and fat.

hide

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) hiden, huden, from (etyl) . Related to (l) and (l).

Verb

  • To put (something) in a place where it will be harder to discover or out of sight.
  • * 1856 , (Gustave Flaubert), (Madame Bovary), Part III Chapter XI, translated by Eleanor Marx-Aveling
  • The blind man, whom he had not been able to cure with the pomade, had gone back to the hill of Bois-Guillaume, where he told the travellers of the vain attempt of the druggist, to such an extent, that Homais when he went to town hid himself behind the curtains of the "Hirondelle" to avoid meeting him.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-19, author=(Timothy Garton Ash)
  • , volume=189, issue=6, page=18, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Where Dr Pangloss meets Machiavelli , passage=Hidden behind thickets of acronyms and gorse bushes of detail, a new great game is under way across the globe. Some call it geoeconomics, but it's geopolitics too. The current power play consists of an extraordinary range of countries simultaneously sitting down to negotiate big free trade and investment agreements.}}
  • To put oneself in a place where one will be harder to find or out of sight.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= William E. Conner
  • , title= An Acoustic Arms Race , volume=101, issue=3, page=206-7, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Nonetheless, some insect prey take advantage of clutter by hiding in it. Earless ghost swift moths become “invisible” to echolocating bats by forming mating clusters close (less than half a meter) above vegetation and effectively blending into the clutter of echoes that the bat receives from the leaves and stems around them.}}
    Synonyms
    * (transitive) conceal, hide away, secrete * (intransitive) go undercover, hide away, hide oneself, hide out, lie low
    Antonyms
    * (transitive) disclose, expose, reveal, show, uncover * (intransitive) reveal oneself, show oneself
    Derived terms
    * hide and seek / hide-and-seek * hideaway * hideout * hide one's light under a bushel * hider * one can run but one can't hide

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (countable) (mainly British) A covered structure from which hunters, birdwatchers, etc can observe animals without scaring them.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) , 'to cover'. More at (l).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (countable) The skin of an animal.
  • (obsolete, or, derogatory) The human skin.
  • * Shakespeare
  • O tiger's heart, wrapped in a woman's hide !
  • (uncountable, informal, usually, US) One's own life or personal safety, especially when in peril.
  • * 1957 , (Ayn Rand), Francisco d'Anconia's speech in (Atlas Shrugged):
  • The rotter who simpers that he sees no difference between the power of money and the power of the whip, ought to learn the difference on his own hide —as I think he will.
    Synonyms
    * (animal skin) pelt, skin * (land measure) carucate
    Derived terms
    * cowhide * damn your hide * have someone's hide * rawhide * tan someone's hide

    Verb

  • To beat with a whip made from hide.
  • * 1891 , Robert Weir, J. Moray Brown, Riding
  • He ran last week, and he was hided , and he was out on the day before yesterday, and here he is once more, and he knows he's got to run and to be hided again.

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) hide, from (etyl) . More at (l), (l).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A medieval land measure equal to the amount of land that could sustain one free family; usually 100 acres. Forty hides equalled a barony.
  • flesh

    English

    (wikipedia flesh)

    Noun

    (-)
  • The soft tissue of the body, especially muscle and fat.
  • *1918 , Fannie Farmer, , Chapter XVII: Poultry and Game:
  • *:The flesh of chicken, fowl, and turkey has much shorter fibre than that of ruminating animals, and is not intermingled with fat,—the fat always being found in layers directly under the skin, and surrounding the intestines.
  • The skin of a human or animal.
  • (by extension) Bare arms, bare legs, bare torso.
  • (archaic) Animal tissue regarded as food; meat.
  • *:
  • *:Thenne syr launcelot sayd / fader what shalle I do / Now sayd the good man / I requyre yow take this hayre that was this holy mans and putte it nexte thy skynne / and it shalle preuaylle the gretely / syr and I wille doo hit sayd sir launcelot / Also I charge you that ye ete no flesshe as longe as ye be in the quest of the sancgreal / nor ye shalle drynke noo wyne / and that ye here masse dayly and ye may doo hit
  • *c.1530s , , 7, xix-xxi,
  • *:The flesh' that twycheth any vnclene thinge shall not be eaten. but burnt with fire:and all that be clene in their flesh, maye eate ' flesh .
  • *:Yf any soule eate of the flesh' of the peaceofferynges, that pertayne vnto the Lorde and hys vnclennesse yet apon him, the same soule shall perisshe from amonge his peoole(sic). ¶ Moreouer yf a soule twych any vnclene thinge, whether it be the vnclennesse of man or of any vnclene beest or any abhominacion that is vnclene: ad the eate of the ' flesh of the peaceoffrynges whiche pertayne vnto the Lord, that soule shall perissh from his people.
  • The human body as a physical entity.
  • *c.1530s , , 6, x,
  • *:And the preast shall put on his lynen albe and his lynen breches apon his flesh , and take awaye the asshes whiche the fire of the burntsacrifice in the altare hath made, and put them besyde the alter,
  • (religion) The mortal body of a human being, contrasted with the spirit or soul.
  • *1769 , , 5, xvii,
  • *:For the flesh' lusteth against the Spirit, and the Spirit against the ' flesh : and these are contrary the one to the other: so that ye cannot do the things that ye would.
  • *1929 January, Bassett Morgan ( ,
  • *:But death had no gift for me, no power to free me from flesh .
  • (religion) The evil and corrupting principle working in man.
  • The soft, often edible, parts of fruits or vegetables.
  • *2003 , Diana Beresford-Kroeger, Arboretum America: A Philosophy of the Forest , page 81,
  • *:The flesh of black walnuts was a protein-packed winter food carefully hoarded in tall, stilted buildings.
  • (obsolete) Tenderness of feeling; gentleness.
  • *Cowper
  • *:There is no flesh in man's obdurate heart.
  • (obsolete) Kindred; stock; race.
  • *Bible, Genesis xxxvii. 27
  • *:He is our brother and our flesh .
  • A yellowish pink colour; the colour of some Caucasian human skin.
  • :
  • Synonyms

    * See also

    Verb

  • To bury (something, especially a weapon) in flesh.
  • * 1933 , Robert E. Howard, The Scarlet Citadel
  • Give me a clean sword and a clean foe to flesh it in.
  • (obsolete) To inure or habituate someone (in) or (to) a given practice.
  • *, II.7:
  • And whosoever could now joyne us together, and eagerly flesh all our people to a common enterprise, we should make our ancient military name and chivalrous credit to flourish againe.
  • To put flesh on; to fatten.
  • To add details.
  • The writer had to go back and flesh out the climactic scene.
  • To remove the flesh from the skin during the making of leather.
  • Derived terms

    * exchange flesh * flesh and blood * flesh fly * flesh out * flesh side * flesh-wing * flesh wound * flesher * fleshing * fleshpot * fleshy * goose flesh * in the flesh * one flesh * pound of flesh * press the flesh * proud flesh * way of all flesh

    See also

    * carrion * incarnate * sarcoid *

    Anagrams

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