Flamebait vs Bait - What's the difference?

flamebait | bait | Derived terms |

Flamebait is a derived term of bait.


As nouns the difference between flamebait and bait

is that flamebait is (internet slang) content in an online forum, such as a newsgroup, with the intent of provoking anger, resulting in flames and sometimes flamewars while bait is any substance, especially food, used in catching fish, or other animals, by alluring them to a hook, snare, trap, or net.

As a verb bait is

to attract with bait; to entice or bait can be to set dogs on (an animal etc) to bite or worry; to attack with dogs, especially for sport or bait can be (obsolete|intransitive) to flap the wings; to flutter as if to fly; or to hover, as a hawk when she stoops to her prey.

flamebait

English

Noun

(-)
  • (Internet slang) Content in an online forum, such as a newsgroup, with the intent of provoking anger, resulting in flames and sometimes flamewars.
  • bait

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) bait, beite, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Any substance, especially food, used in catching fish, or other animals, by alluring them to a hook, snare, trap, or net.
  • Food containing poison or a harmful additive to kill animals that are pests.
  • Anything which allures; a lure; enticement; temptation.
  • (Fairfax)
  • A portion of food or drink, as a refreshment taken on a journey; also, a stop for rest and refreshment.
  • A light or hasty luncheon.
  • Usage notes
    Used in Geordie dialect of English to denote your lunch at work as opposed to other meals. Also used in East Anglian dialect of English to denote a small meal taken mid-morning while farming, and in the North of England to denote a snack taken by miners to eat while working.
    Derived terms
    * baiting * flamebait * jailbait * shark bait
    References
    * * * * *

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To attract with bait; to entice.
  • To affix bait to a trap or a fishing hook or fishing line.
  • * Washington Irving
  • a crooked pin bailed with a vile earthworm
    Usage notes
    * This verb is sometimes confused in writing with the rare verb (bate), which is pronounced identically; in particular, the expression (with bated breath) is frequently misspelled *(term) by writers unfamiliar with the verb (bate).

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) baiten, beiten, from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To set dogs on (an animal etc.) to bite or worry; to attack with dogs, especially for sport.
  • :to bait''' a bear with dogs;  to '''bait a bull
  • To intentionally annoy, torment, or threaten by constant rebukes or threats; to harass.
  • To feed and water (a horse or other animal), especially during a journey.
  • *, Bk.V, Ch.ix:
  • *:And than they com into a lowe medow that was full of swete floures, and there thes noble knyghtes bayted her horses.
  • Of a horse or other animal: to take food, especially during a journey.
  • *, II.22:
  • *:King Cyrus , that he might more speedily receave news from al parts of his Empire (which was of exceeding great length), would needs have it tried how far a horse could in a day goe outright without baiting , at which distance he caused stations to be set up, and men to have fresh horses ready for al such as came to him.
  • To stop to take a portion of food and drink for refreshment during a journey.
  • *Milton
  • *:Evil news rides post, while good news baits .
  • *Evelyn
  • *:My lord's coach conveyed me to Bury, and thence baiting at Newmarket.
  • See also
    *

    Etymology 3

    (etyl) battre de l'aile'' or ''des ailes , to flap or flutter.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To flap the wings; to flutter as if to fly; or to hover, as a hawk when she stoops to her prey.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Kites that bait and beat.

    Anagrams

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