Limit vs Fix - What's the difference?

limit | fix |


As a noun limit

is limit (restriction).

As an abbreviation fix is

(clotting factor ix).

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

limit

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl), from (etyl), from (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • A restriction; a bound beyond which one may not go.
  • There are several existing limits to executive power.
    Two drinks is my limit tonight.
  • * 1839 , (Charles Dickens), Nicholas Nickleby , chapter 21:
  • It is the conductor which communicates to the inhabitants of regions beyond its limit ,
  • * 1922 , , Ulysses , episode 17:
  • Ever he would wander, selfcompelled, to the extreme limit of his cometary orbit, beyond the fixed stars and variable suns and telescopic planets, astronomical waifs and strays, to the extreme boundary of space,
  • * 2012 March 6, Dan McCrum, Nicole Bullock and Guy Chazan, Financial Times , “Utility buyout loses power in shale gas revolution”:
  • At the time, there seemed to be no limit to the size of ever-larger private equity deals, with banks falling over each other to arrange financing on generous terms and to invest money from their own private equity arms.
  • (mathematics) A value to which a sequence converges. Equivalently, the common value of the upper limit and the lower limit of a sequence: if the upper and lower limits are different, then the sequence has no limit (i.e., does not converge).
  • The sequence of reciprocals has zero as its limit.
  • (mathematics) Any of several abstractions of this concept of limit.
  • Category theory defines a very general concept of limit.
  • (category theory) Given diagram F'' : ''J'' → ''C'', a cone (''L'', ''φ'') from ''L'' ∈ Ob(''C'') to ''F'' is the ''limit'' of ''F'' if it has the universal property that for any other cone (''N'', ''ψ'') from ''N'' ∈ Ob(''C'') to ''F'' there is a unique morphism ''u'' : ''N'' → ''L'' such that for all ''X'' ∈ Ob(''J ), \phi_X \circ u = \psi_X .
  • (poker) Short for fixed limit.
  • The final, utmost, or furthest point; the border or edge.
  • the limit of a walk, of a town, or of a country
  • * Alexander Pope
  • As eager of the chase, the maid / Beyond the forest's verdant limits strayed.
  • (obsolete) The space or thing defined by limits.
  • * Shakespeare
  • The archdeacon hath divided it / Into three limits very equally.
  • (obsolete) That which terminates a period of time; hence, the period itself; the full time or extent.
  • * Shakespeare
  • the dateless limit of thy dear exile
  • * Shakespeare
  • The limit of your lives is out.
  • (obsolete) A restriction; a check or curb; a hindrance.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I prithee, give no limits to my tongue.
  • (logic, metaphysics) A determining feature; a distinguishing characteristic.
  • Synonyms
    * (restriction) bound, boundary, limitation, restriction
    Derived terms
    * age limit * central limit theorem * city limits * elastic limit * in the limit * limit down * limit up * limitation * limitless * lower limit * outer limit * the sky is the limit * to the limit * time limit * unlimited * upper limit
    Descendants
    * German: (l)

    See also

    * bound * function

    Adjective

    (-)
  • (poker) Being a fixed limit game.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) ; see noun.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To restrict; not to allow to go beyond a certain bound.
  • *
  • [The Chinese government] has jailed environmental activists and is planning to limit the power of judicial oversight by handing a state-approved body a monopoly over bringing environmental lawsuits.
  • (mathematics) To have a limit in a particular set.
  • (obsolete) To beg, or to exercise functions, within a certain limited region.
  • Synonyms
    * (restrict) cap; restrict; withstrain

    fix

    English

    Alternative forms

    * fixe (archaic)

    Noun

    (es)
  • A repair or corrective action.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-28, author=(Joris Luyendijk)
  • , volume=189, issue=3, page=21, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Our banks are out of control , passage=Seeing the British establishment struggle with the financial sector is like watching an alcoholic […].  Until 2008 there was denial over what finance had become. […]  But the scandals kept coming, […]. A broad section of the political class now recognises the need for change but remains unable to see the necessity of a fundamental overhaul. Instead it offers fixes and patches.}}
  • A difficult situation; a quandary or dilemma.
  • (informal) A single dose of an addictive drug administered to a drug user.
  • * (Alain Jourgensen)
  • "Just one fix !"
  • A prearrangement of the outcome of a supposedly competitive process, such as a sporting event, a game, an election, a trial, or a bid.
  • *
  • A determination of location.
  • (US) fettlings (mixture used to line a furnace)
  • Synonyms

    * See also

    Verb

  • (obsolete) To pierce; now generally replaced by transfix.
  • # (by extension) (Of a piercing look) to direct at someone.
  • He fixed me with a sickly grin, and said, "I told you it wouldn't work!"
  • To attach; to affix; to hold in place.
  • A dab of chewing gum will fix your note to the bulletin board.
    A leech can fix itself to your skin without you feeling it.
  • # (transitive, figuratively, usually in the passive) To focus or determine (oneself, on a concept); to fixate.
  • She's fixed on the idea of becoming a doctor.
  • To mend, to repair.
  • That heater will start a fire if you don't fix it.
  • (informal) To prepare (food).
  • She fixed dinner for the kids.
  • To make (a contest, vote, or gamble) unfair; to privilege one contestant or a particular group of contestants, usually before the contest begins; to arrange immunity for defendants by tampering with the justice system via bribery or extortionSutherland, Edwin H. (ed) (1937): The Professional Thief: by a Professional Thief. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. [Reprinted by various publishers in subsequent decades.]
  • A majority of voters believed the election was fixed in favor of the incumbent.
  • (transitive, US, informal) To surgically render an animal, especially a pet, infertile.
  • Rover stopped digging under the fence after we had the vet fix him.
  • (transitive, mathematics, sematics) To map a (point or subset) to itself.
  • (informal) To take revenge on, to best; to serve justice on an assumed miscreant.
  • He got caught breaking into lockers, so a couple of guys fixed him after work.
  • To render (a photographic impression) permanent by treating with such applications as will make it insensitive to the action of light.
  • (transitive, chemistry, biology) To convert into a stable or available form.
  • Legumes are valued in crop rotation for their ability to fix nitrogen.
    (Abney)
  • To become fixed; to settle or remain permanently; to cease from wandering; to rest.
  • * (rfdate) (Waller)
  • Your kindness banishes your fear, / Resolved to fix forever here.
  • To become firm, so as to resist volatilization; to cease to flow or be fluid; to congeal; to become hard and malleable, as a metallic substance.
  • (Francis Bacon)

    Synonyms

    * (make a contest unfair) doctor, rig * (render infertile) neuter, spay, desex, castrate * See also

    Antonyms

    * (to hold in place) move, change

    Derived terms

    * affix, affixative, fixed * fixings, fixity, fixety * fix someone's wagon, fix someone up with