Stir vs Fit - What's the difference?

stir | fit | Related terms |

Stir is a related term of fit.


As a noun stir

is scorpion.

As an abbreviation fit is

(travel industry|aviation) fully inclusive tour.

stir

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) stiren, from (etyl) styrian, from (etyl) .

Verb

(stirr)
  • To change the place of in any manner; to move.
  • *(rfdate), (Sir William Temple)
  • *:My foot I had never yet in five days been able to stir .
  • (lb) To disturb the relative position of the particles of, as of a liquid, by passing something through it; to agitate.
  • :
  • *(rfdate), (William Shakespeare)
  • *:My mind is troubled, like a fountain stirred .
  • (lb) To agitate the content of (a container) by passing something through it.
  • :
  • (lb) To bring into debate; to agitate; to moot.
  • *(rfdate), (Francis Bacon)
  • *:Stir not questions of jurisdiction.
  • (lb) To incite to action; to arouse; to instigate; to prompt; to excite.
  • *(rfdate) (Chaucer)
  • *:To stir men to devotion.
  • *(rfdate), (William Shakespeare)
  • *:An Ate, stirring him to blood and strife.
  • *(rfdate), (John Dryden)
  • *:And for her sake some mutiny will stir .
  • *1922 , (Margery Williams), (The Velveteen Rabbit)
  • *:That night he was almost too happy to sleep, and so much love stirred in his little sawdust heart that it almost burst.
  • (lb) To move; to change one’s position.
  • *(rfdate) (Byron)
  • *:I had not power to stir or strive, But felt that I was still alive.
  • (lb) To be in motion; to be active or bustling; to exert or busy oneself.
  • *(rfdate) (Byron)
  • *:All are not fit with them to stir and toil.
  • *(rfdate) (Charles Merivale)
  • *:The friends of the unfortunate exile, far from resenting his unjust suspicions, were stirring anxiously in his behalf.
  • (lb) To become the object of notice; to be on foot.
  • *(rfdate), (Isaac Watts)
  • *:They fancy they have a right to talk freely upon everything that stirs or appears.
  • To rise, or be up and about, in the morning.
  • *
  • *:"Mid-Lent, and the Enemy grins," remarked Selwyn as he started for church with Nina and the children. Austin, knee-deep in a dozen Sunday supplements, refused to stir ; poor little Eileen was now convalescent from grippe, but still unsteady on her legs; her maid had taken the grippe, and now moaned all day: "Mon dieu! Mon dieu! Che fais mourir! "
  • Usage notes
    * In all transitive senses except the first, (term) is often followed by (up) with an intensive effect; as, (term); (term).
    Synonyms
    * (to move) incite; awaken; rouse; animate; stimulate; excite; provoke.
    Derived terms
    * stir-fry * stirrer * stir up * straw that stirs the drink

    Noun

  • The act or result of stirring; agitation; tumult; bustle; noise or various movements.
  • * (rfdate), .
  • Why all these words, this clamor, and this stir ?
  • * (rfdate), .
  • ''Consider, after so much stir about genus and species, how few words we have yet settled definitions of.
  • Public disturbance or commotion; tumultuous disorder; seditious uproar.
  • * (rfdate), .
  • Being advertised of some stirs raised by his unnatural sons in England.
  • Agitation of thoughts; conflicting passions.
  • Etymology 2

    (en)

    Noun

    (-)
  • (lb) Jail; prison.
  • :
  • *
  • *:The Bat—they called him the Bat.. He'd never been in stir , the bulls had never mugged him, he didn't run with a mob, he played a lone hand, and fenced his stuff so that even the fence couldn't swear he knew his face. Most lone wolves had a moll at any rate—women were their ruin—but if the Bat had a moll, not even the grapevine telegraph could locate her.
  • Anagrams

    * * English ergative verbs ----

    fit

    English

    Etymology 1

    Possibly from the (etyl) .

    Adjective

    (fitter)
  • Suitable, proper.
  • You have nothing to say about it. I'll do exactly as I see fit .
  • * Bible, Job xxxiv. 18
  • Is it fit to say a king, Thou art wicked?
  • * {{quote-book, year=2005, by=
  • , passage=The rest we'll leave to be examined later, if we think fit ;}}
  • Adapted to a purpose or environment.
  • survival of the fittest
  • * Shakespeare
  • That which ordinary men are fit for, I am qualified in.
  • In good shape; physically well.
  • You don't have to be a good climber for Kilimanjaro, but you do have to be fit .
  • (British, slang) Good looking, fanciable, attractive, beautiful.
  • I think the girl working in the office is fit .
  • Prepared; ready.
  • * Fairfax
  • So fit to shoot, she singled forth among her foes who first her quarry's strength should feel.
    Derived terms
    * fighting fit * fit as a fiddle * fitly * fitness * fittie * unfit

    Etymology 2

    From the adjective .

    Verb

  • To be suitable for.
  • It fits the purpose.
  • * 1918 , Richard Dennis Teall Hollister, Speech-making , publ. George Wahr, pg. 81:
  • The speaker should be certain that his subject fits the occasion.
  • To conform to in size and shape.
  • The small shirt doesn't fit me, so I'll buy the medium size.
    If I lose a few kilos, the gorgeous wedding dress might fit me.
  • To be of the right size and shape, as of clothing.
  • I wanted to borrow my little sister's jeans, but they didn't fit .
  • To make conform in size and shape.
  • I want to fit the drapes to the windows.
  • # To tailor; to change to the appropriate size.
  • I had a suit fitted by the tailor.
  • To be in agreement with.
  • These definitions fit most of the usage.
  • To adjust.
  • The regression program fit a line to the data.
  • To attach, especially when requiring exact positioning or sizing.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2012 , date=May 13 , author=Andrew Benson , title=Williams's Pastor Maldonado takes landmark Spanish Grand Prix win , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=Williams had a problem fitting his left rear tyre and that left Alonso only 3.1secs adrift when he rejoined from his final stop three laps later.}}
  • To equip or supply.
  • The chandler will fit us with provisions for a month.
  • To make ready.
  • I'm fitting the ship for a summer sail home.
  • (archaic) To be seemly.
  • To be proper or becoming.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • Nor fits it to prolong the feast.
  • To be in harmony.
  • The paint, the fabrics, the rugs all fit .
    Derived terms
    * fit like a glove * fit up * misfit

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The degree to which something fits.
  • This shirt is a bad fit .
    Since he put on weight, his jeans have been a tight fit .
  • Conformity of elements one to another.
  • It's hard to get a good fit using second-hand parts.
  • The part of an object upon which anything fits tightly.
  • (advertising) how well a particular commercial execution captures the character or values of a brand.
  • The Wonder Bread advertising research results showed the “White Picket Fence” commercial had strong fit ratings.
  • (statistics) goodness of fit.
  • Usage notes
    Usually used in the singular preceded by an indefinite article and an adjective.

    References

    * (advertising) The Advertising Research Handbook Charles E. Young, Ideas in Flight, Seattle, WA, April 2005

    Etymology 3

    , or, from the sense of fitted to length.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (archaic) A section of a poem or ballad.
  • * 1771 , (1791), vol 2:
  • Dr. Percy has written a long ballad in many fits .
  • * Spenser
  • to play some pleasant fit

    References

    * Oxford English Dictionary: fit, fyte n. 1

    Etymology 4

    .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A seizure or convulsion.
  • My grandfather died after having a fit .
  • (medicine) A sudden and vigorous appearance of a symptom over a short period of time.
  • A sudden outburst of emotion.
  • He had a laughing fit which lasted more than ten minutes.
    She had a fit and had thrown all of his clothes out of the window.
    He threw a fit when his car broke down.
  • A sudden burst (of an activity).
  • *
  • Synonyms
    * (sudden outburst of emotion) blowout, hissy, tantrum, spell, moment * (sudden burst of activity) flurry, frenzy
    Derived terms
    * fits and starts * fit of rage * have a fit * hissy fit * pitch a fit * shit fit * snit fit * throw a fit

    Verb

    (fitt)
  • (medicine) To suffer a fit.