Bound vs Fit - What's the difference?

bound | fit |


As a verb bound

is (bind) or bound can be to surround a territory or other geographical entity or bound can be to leap, move by jumping.

As an adjective bound

is (with infinitive) obliged (to) or bound can be (obsolete) ready, prepared.

As a noun bound

is (often|used in plural) a boundary, the border which one must cross in order to enter or leave a territory or bound can be a sizeable jump, great leap.

As an abbreviation fit is

(travel industry|aviation) fully inclusive tour.

bound

English

Alternative forms

* bownd (archaic)

Etymology 1

See bind

Verb

(head)
  • (bind)
  • * {{quote-book, year=1905, author=
  • , title= , chapter=1 citation , passage=“[…] Captain Markam had been found lying half-insensible, gagged and bound , on the floor of the sitting-room, his hands and feet tightly pinioned, and a woollen comforter wound closely round his mouth and neck?; whilst Mrs. Markham's jewel-case, containing valuable jewellery and the secret plans of Port Arthur, had disappeared. […]”}}
    ''I bound the splint to my leg.
    ''I had bound the splint with duct tape.

    Adjective

    (-)
  • (with infinitive) Obliged (to).
  • * {{quote-book, year=1905, author=
  • , title= , chapter=5 citation , passage=Then I had a good think on the subject of the hocussing of Cigarette, and I was reluctantly bound to admit that once again the man in the corner had found the only possible solution to the mystery.}}
  • (with infinitive) Very likely (to).
  • * , chapter=5
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients , passage=When you're well enough off so's you don't have to fret about anything but your heft or your diseases you begin to get queer, I suppose. And the queerer the cure for those ailings the bigger the attraction. A place like the Right Livers' Rest was bound to draw freaks, same as molasses draws flies.}}
  • (linguistics, of a morpheme) That cannot stand alone as a free word.
  • (mathematics, logic, of a variable) Constrained by a quantifier.
  • (dated) constipated; costive
  • Antonyms
    * free
    Derived terms
    * bound to * I'll be bound

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) bounde, from (etyl) bunne, from

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (often, used in plural) A boundary, the border which one must cross in order to enter or leave a territory.
  • I reached the northern bound of my property, took a deep breath and walked on.
    Somewhere within these bounds you may find a buried treasure.
  • (mathematics) a value which is known to be greater or smaller than a given set of values
  • Derived terms
    * boundary * boundless * harmonic bounding * least upper bound * lower bound * metes and bounds * out of bounds * upper bound * within bounds

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To surround a territory or other geographical entity.
  • ''France, Portugal, Gibraltar and Andorra bound Spain.
    ''Kansas is bounded by Nebraska on the north, Missouri on the east, Oklahoma on the south and Colorado on the west.
  • (mathematics) To be the boundary of.
  • Derived terms
    * unbound * unbounded

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A sizeable jump, great leap.
  • ''The deer crossed the stream in a single bound .
  • A spring from one foot to the other in dancing.
  • (dated) A bounce; a rebound.
  • the bound of a ball
    (Johnson)
    Derived terms
    * by leaps and bounds

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To leap, move by jumping.
  • ''The rabbit bounded down the lane.
  • To cause to leap.
  • to bound a horse
    (Shakespeare)
  • (dated) To rebound; to bounce.
  • a rubber ball bounds on the floor
  • (dated) To cause to rebound; to throw so that it will rebound; to bounce.
  • to bound a ball on the floor
    Derived terms
    * rebound

    Etymology 4

    Alteration of boun , with -d partly for euphonic effect and partly by association with Etymology 1, above.

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (obsolete) ready, prepared.
  • ready, able to start or go (to); moving in the direction (of).
  • ''Which way are you bound ?
    ''Is that message bound for me?
    Derived terms
    * -bound * bound for

    fit

    English

    Etymology 1

    Possibly from the (etyl) .

    Adjective

    (fitter)
  • Suitable, proper.
  • You have nothing to say about it. I'll do exactly as I see fit .
  • * Bible, Job xxxiv. 18
  • Is it fit to say a king, Thou art wicked?
  • * {{quote-book, year=2005, by=
  • , passage=The rest we'll leave to be examined later, if we think fit ;}}
  • Adapted to a purpose or environment.
  • survival of the fittest
  • * Shakespeare
  • That which ordinary men are fit for, I am qualified in.
  • In good shape; physically well.
  • You don't have to be a good climber for Kilimanjaro, but you do have to be fit .
  • (British, slang) Good looking, fanciable, attractive, beautiful.
  • I think the girl working in the office is fit .
  • Prepared; ready.
  • * Fairfax
  • So fit to shoot, she singled forth among her foes who first her quarry's strength should feel.
    Derived terms
    * fighting fit * fit as a fiddle * fitly * fitness * fittie * unfit

    Etymology 2

    From the adjective .

    Verb

  • To be suitable for.
  • It fits the purpose.
  • * 1918 , Richard Dennis Teall Hollister, Speech-making , publ. George Wahr, pg. 81:
  • The speaker should be certain that his subject fits the occasion.
  • To conform to in size and shape.
  • The small shirt doesn't fit me, so I'll buy the medium size.
    If I lose a few kilos, the gorgeous wedding dress might fit me.
  • To be of the right size and shape, as of clothing.
  • I wanted to borrow my little sister's jeans, but they didn't fit .
  • To make conform in size and shape.
  • I want to fit the drapes to the windows.
  • # To tailor; to change to the appropriate size.
  • I had a suit fitted by the tailor.
  • To be in agreement with.
  • These definitions fit most of the usage.
  • To adjust.
  • The regression program fit a line to the data.
  • To attach, especially when requiring exact positioning or sizing.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2012 , date=May 13 , author=Andrew Benson , title=Williams's Pastor Maldonado takes landmark Spanish Grand Prix win , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=Williams had a problem fitting his left rear tyre and that left Alonso only 3.1secs adrift when he rejoined from his final stop three laps later.}}
  • To equip or supply.
  • The chandler will fit us with provisions for a month.
  • To make ready.
  • I'm fitting the ship for a summer sail home.
  • (archaic) To be seemly.
  • To be proper or becoming.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • Nor fits it to prolong the feast.
  • To be in harmony.
  • The paint, the fabrics, the rugs all fit .
    Derived terms
    * fit like a glove * fit up * misfit

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The degree to which something fits.
  • This shirt is a bad fit .
    Since he put on weight, his jeans have been a tight fit .
  • Conformity of elements one to another.
  • It's hard to get a good fit using second-hand parts.
  • The part of an object upon which anything fits tightly.
  • (advertising) how well a particular commercial execution captures the character or values of a brand.
  • The Wonder Bread advertising research results showed the “White Picket Fence” commercial had strong fit ratings.
  • (statistics) goodness of fit.
  • Usage notes
    Usually used in the singular preceded by an indefinite article and an adjective.

    References

    * (advertising) The Advertising Research Handbook Charles E. Young, Ideas in Flight, Seattle, WA, April 2005

    Etymology 3

    , or, from the sense of fitted to length.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (archaic) A section of a poem or ballad.
  • * 1771 , (1791), vol 2:
  • Dr. Percy has written a long ballad in many fits .
  • * Spenser
  • to play some pleasant fit

    References

    * Oxford English Dictionary: fit, fyte n. 1

    Etymology 4

    .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A seizure or convulsion.
  • My grandfather died after having a fit .
  • (medicine) A sudden and vigorous appearance of a symptom over a short period of time.
  • A sudden outburst of emotion.
  • He had a laughing fit which lasted more than ten minutes.
    She had a fit and had thrown all of his clothes out of the window.
    He threw a fit when his car broke down.
  • A sudden burst (of an activity).
  • *
  • Synonyms
    * (sudden outburst of emotion) blowout, hissy, tantrum, spell, moment * (sudden burst of activity) flurry, frenzy
    Derived terms
    * fits and starts * fit of rage * have a fit * hissy fit * pitch a fit * shit fit * snit fit * throw a fit

    Verb

    (fitt)
  • (medicine) To suffer a fit.