Simple vs First - What's the difference?

simple | first | Related terms |

Simple is a related term of first.


As nouns the difference between simple and first

is that simple is (medicine) a preparation made from one plant, as opposed to something made from more than one plant while first is ridge (of roof).

As an adjective simple

is uncomplicated; taken by itself, with nothing added.

As a verb simple

is (transitive|intransitive|archaic) to gather simples, ie, medicinal herbs.

simple

English

Adjective

(er)
  • Uncomplicated; taken by itself, with nothing added.
  • *
  • *:“[…] We are engaged in a great work, a treatise on our river fortifications, perhaps? But since when did army officers afford the luxury of amanuenses in this simple republic?”
  • *2001 , Sydney I. Landau, Dictionaries: The Art and Craft of Lexicography , Cambridge University Press (ISBN 0-521-78512-X), page 167,
  • *:There is no simple way to define precisely a complex arrangement of parts, however homely the object may appear to be.
  • Without ornamentation; plain.
  • Free from duplicity; guileless, innocent, straightforward.
  • * (ca.1576-1634)
  • *:Full many fine men go upon my score, as simple as I stand here, and I trust them.
  • *(Lord Byron) (1788-1824)
  • *:Must thou trust Tradition's simple tongue?
  • *(Ralph Waldo Emerson) (1803-1882)
  • *:To be simple is to be great.
  • Undistinguished in social condition; of no special rank.
  • Trivial; insignificant.
  • *1485 , (Thomas Malory), (w, Le Morte d'Arthur) , Book X:
  • *:‘That was a symple cause,’ seyde Sir Trystram, ‘for to sle a good knyght for seyynge well by his maystir.’
  • Feeble-minded; foolish.
  • Structurally uncomplicated.
  • #(lb) Consisting of one single substance; uncompounded.
  • #(lb) Of a group: having no normal subgroup.
  • #(lb) Not compound, but possibly lobed.
  • #(lb) Consisting of a single individual or zooid; not compound.
  • #:
  • #(lb) Homogenous.
  • (lb) Mere; not other than; being only.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:A medicinewhose simple touch / Is powerful to araise King Pepin.
  • Synonyms

    * (consisting of a single part or aspect) onefold * (having few parts or features) plain * See also

    Antonyms

    * (having few parts or features) complex, compound, complicated * (uncomplicated) subtle

    Derived terms

    * fee simple * future simple * oversimple * past simple * plain and simple * present simple * pure and simple * simple beam * simple connectivity * simple contract * simple dislocation * simple equation * simple extension * simple eye * simple fraction * simple fracture * simple fruit * simple function * simple future * simple group * simple harmonic motion * simple-hearted * simple interest * simple leaf * simple linear regression * simple machine * simple mastectomy * simple microscope * simple-minded * simple past * simple pendulum * simple pistil * simple pole * simple present * simple protein * simple regression * simple sentence * Simple Simon * simple sugar * simple syrup * simple time * simple trust * simplehead * simpleness * simpless * simplex * simply * single * simplicity * simpleton

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (medicine) A preparation made from one plant, as opposed to something made from more than one plant.
  • *, II.37:
  • *:I know there are some simples , which in operation are moistening and some drying.
  • *Sir W. Temple
  • *:What virtue is in this remedy lies in the naked simple itself as it comes over from the Indies.
  • (obsolete) A term for a physician, derived from the medicinal term above.
  • (logic) A simple or atomic proposition.
  • (obsolete) Something not mixed or compounded.
  • *Shakespeare
  • *:compounded of many simples
  • (weaving) A drawloom.
  • (weaving) Part of the apparatus for raising the heddles of a drawloom.
  • (Roman Catholic) A feast which is not a double or a semidouble.
  • Verb

    (simpl)
  • (transitive, intransitive, archaic) To gather simples, ie, medicinal herbs.
  • Derived terms

    * simpler * simplist * simplify

    Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    * 1000 English basic words ----

    first

    English

    (wikipedia first)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) (m), (m), (m), (m), from (etyl) (m), .

    Alternative forms

    * firste (archaic) * fyrst (obsolete) * fyrste (obsolete)

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Preceding all others of a series or kind; the ordinal of one; earliest.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=2 , passage=Sunning himself on the board steps, I saw for the first time Mr. Farquhar Fenelon Cooke. He was dressed out in broad gaiters and bright tweeds, like an English tourist, and his face might have belonged to Dagon, idol of the Philistines.}}
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-03, volume=408, issue=8847, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Yesterday’s fuel , passage=The dawn of the oil age was fairly recent. Although the stuff was used to waterproof boats in the Middle East 6,000 years ago, extracting it in earnest began only in 1859 after an oil strike in Pennsylvania. The first barrels of crude fetched $18 (around $450 at today’s prices).}}
  • Most eminent or exalted; most excellent; chief; highest.
  • * 1784 : William Jones, The Description and Use of a New Portable Orrery, &c. , PREFACE
  • THE favourable reception the Orrery has met with from Per?ons of the fir?t di?tinction, and from Gentlemen and Ladies in general, has induced me to add to it ?everal new improvements in order to give it a degree of Perfection; and di?tingui?h it from others; which by Piracy, or Imitation, may be introduced to the Public.
    Alternative forms
    * ; (in names of monarchs and popes) I

    Adverb

    (-)
  • Before anything else; firstly.
  • * , chapter=8
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients , passage=That concertina was a wonder in its way. The handles that was on it first was wore out long ago, and he'd made new ones of braided rope yarn. And the bellows was patched in more places than a cranberry picker's overalls.}}
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-29, volume=407, issue=8842, page=29, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Unspontaneous combustion , passage=Since the mid-1980s, when Indonesia first began to clear its bountiful forests on an industrial scale in favour of lucrative palm-oil plantations, “haze” has become an almost annual occurrence in South-East Asia.}}

    Noun

  • (uncountable) The person or thing in the first position.
  • * 1699 , , Heads designed for an essay on conversations
  • Study gives strength to the mind; conversation, grace: the first apt to give stiffness, the other suppleness: one gives substance and form to the statue, the other polishes it.
  • (uncountable) The first gear of an engine.
  • (countable) Something that has never happened before; a new occurrence.
  • (countable, baseball) first base
  • (countable, British, colloquial) A first-class honours degree.
  • (countable, colloquial) A first-edition copy of some publication.
  • A fraction of an integer ending in one.
  • Derived terms

    * feet first * firstborn * first-class * first gear * first imperative (Latin grammar) * first of all * first place * first things first * first up

    See also

    * primary

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) (m), (m), (m), from (etyl) (m), (m), . See also (l).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) Time; time granted; respite.
  • Statistics

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