Penetrate vs Filter - What's the difference?

penetrate | filter |


As a verb penetrate

is to enter into; to make way into the interior of; to pierce.

As a noun filter is

filter.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

penetrate

English

(Penetration)

Verb

(penetrat)
  • To enter into; to make way into the interior of; to pierce.
  • Light penetrates darkness.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1879, title=The Telephone, the Microphone and the Phonograph
  • , author=Th Du Moncel, page=166, publisher=Harper , passage=He takes the prepared charcoal used by artists, brings it to a white heat, and suddenly plunges it in a bath of mercury, of which the globules instantly penetrate the pores of charcoal, and may be said to metallize it.}}
  • (figuratively) To achieve understanding of, despite some obstacle; to comprehend; to understand.
  • I could not penetrate Burke's opaque rhetoric.
  • * Ray
  • things which here were too subtile for us to penetrate
  • To affect profoundly through the senses or feelings; to move deeply.
  • to penetrate one's heart with pity
  • * M. Arnold
  • The translator of Homer should penetrate himself with a sense of the plainness and directness of Homer's style.
    (Shakespeare)
  • To infiltrate an enemy to gather intelligence.
  • To insert the penis into an opening, such as a vagina or anus. (rfex)
  • Derived terms

    * penetration * penetrable

    filter

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A device which separates a suspended, dissolved, or particulate matter from a fluid, solution, or other substance; any device that separates one substance from another.
  • Electronics or software that separates unwanted signals (for example noise) from wanted signals or that attenuates selected frequencies.
  • Any item, mechanism, device or procedure that acts to separate or isolate.
  • * {{quote-magazine, title=No hiding place
  • , date=2013-05-25, volume=407, issue=8837, page=74, magazine=(The Economist) citation , passage=In America alone, people spent $170 billion on “direct marketing”—junk mail of both the physical and electronic varieties—last year. Yet of those who received unsolicited adverts through the post, only 3% bought anything as a result. If the bumf arrived electronically, the take-up rate was 0.1%. And for online adverts the “conversion” into sales was a minuscule 0.01%. That means about $165 billion was spent not on drumming up business, but on annoying people, creating landfill and cluttering spam filters .}}
  • (mathematics, order theory) A non-empty upper set (of a partially ordered set) which is closed under binary infima (a.k.a. meets).
  • The collection of cofinite subsets of ''?'' is a filter under inclusion: it includes the intersection of every pair of its members, and includes every superset of every cofinite set.
    If (1) the universal set (here, the set of natural numbers) were called a "large" set, (2) the superset of any "large" set were also a "large" set, and (3) the intersection of a pair of "large" sets were also a "large" set, then the set of all "large" sets would form a filter .

    Antonyms

    * (order theory) ideal

    Hyponyms

    * (order theory) ultrafilter

    Derived terms

    * air filter * cigarette filter * fuel filter * oil filter * glare filter

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To sort, sift, or isolate.
  • * This strainer should filter out the large particles.
  • * '>citation
  • To diffuse; to cause to be less concentrated or focused.
  • * The leaves of the trees filtered the light.
  • To pass through a filter or to act as though passing through a filter.
  • * The water filtered through the rock and soil.
  • To move slowly or gradually; to come or go a few at a time.
  • * The crowd filtered into the theater.
  • To ride a motorcycle between lanes on a road
  • * I can skip past all the traffic on my bike by filtering .
  • Synonyms

    * to filter out (something)

    Anagrams

    * * ----