Figure vs Model - What's the difference?

figure | model |


In context|logic|lang=en terms the difference between figure and model

is that figure is (logic) the form of a syllogism with respect to the relative position of the middle term while model is (logic) an interpretation which makes a certain sentence true, in which case that interpretation is called a model of that sentence.

As nouns the difference between figure and model

is that figure is a drawing or diagram conveying information while model is a person who serves as a subject for artwork or fashion, usually in the medium of photography but also for painting or drawing.

As verbs the difference between figure and model

is that figure is to solve a mathematical problem while model is to display for others to see, especially in regard to wearing clothing while performing the role of a fashion model.

As an adjective model is

worthy of being a model; exemplary.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

figure

English

(wikipedia figure)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A drawing or diagram conveying information.
  • *
  • The representation of any form, as by drawing, painting, modelling, carving, embroidering, etc.; especially, a representation of the human body.
  • a figure''' in bronze; a '''figure cut in marble
  • * Shakespeare
  • a coin that bears the figure of an angel
  • A person or thing representing a certain consciousness.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-28, author=(Joris Luyendijk)
  • , volume=189, issue=3, page=21, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Our banks are out of control , passage=Seeing the British establishment struggle with the financial sector is like watching an alcoholic […].  Until 2008 there was denial over what finance had become. When a series of bank failures made this impossible, there was widespread anger, leading to the public humiliation of symbolic figures .}}
  • The appearance or impression made by the conduct or career of a person.
  • He cut a sorry figure standing there in the rain.
  • * Dryden
  • I made some figure there.
  • * Blackstone
  • gentlemen of the best figure in the county
  • (obsolete) Distinguished appearance; magnificence; conspicuous representation; splendour; show.
  • * Law
  • that he may live in figure and indulgence
  • A human figure, which dress or corset must fit to; the shape of a human body.
  • *
  • A numeral.
  • A number.
  • *
  • A shape.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • Flowers have all exquisite figures .
  • *
  • A visible pattern as in wood or cloth.
  • The muslin was of a pretty figure .
  • A dance figure, a complex dance move(w).
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=5 , passage=Although the Celebrity was almost impervious to sarcasm, he was now beginning to exhibit visible signs of uneasiness,
  • A figure of speech.
  • * Macaulay
  • to represent the imagination under the figure of a wing
  • (logic) The form of a syllogism with respect to the relative position of the middle term.
  • (astrology) A horoscope; the diagram of the aspects of the astrological houses.
  • (Johnson)
  • (music) Any short succession of notes, either as melody or as a group of chords, which produce a single complete and distinct impression.
  • (Grove)
  • (music) A form of melody or accompaniment kept up through a strain or passage; a motif; a florid embellishment.
  • Derived terms

    (Terms derived from the noun) * academy figure * action figure * authority figure * big figure * dark figure * cut a figure * father figure * figure dash * figure eight * figurehead * figureless * figure loom * figure of eight * figure of merit * figure of speech * figure poem * figure skating * four-figure * hate figure * hourglass figure * lay figure * Lissajous figure * mother figure * musical figure * plane figure * public figure * significant figure * snow figure * stick figure * terminal figure * text figure * three-figure * two-figure

    Verb

    (mainly US)
  • To solve a mathematical problem.
  • To come to understand.
  • I can't figure if he's telling the truth or lying.
  • To be reasonable.
  • To enter, be a part of.
  • (obsolete) To represent by a figure, as to form or mould; to make an image of, either palpable or ideal; also, to fashion into a determinate form; to shape.
  • * Prior
  • If love, alas! be pain I bear, / No thought can figure , and no tongue declare.
  • To embellish with design; to adorn with figures.
  • * Shakespeare
  • The vaulty top of heaven / Figured quite o'er with burning meteors.
  • (obsolete) To indicate by numerals.
  • * Dryden
  • As through a crystal glass the figured hours are seen.
  • To represent by a metaphor; to signify or symbolize.
  • * Shakespeare
  • whose white vestments figure innocence
  • (obsolete) To prefigure; to foreshow.
  • * Shakespeare
  • In this the heaven figures some event.
  • (music) To write over or under the bass, as figures or other characters, in order to indicate the accompanying chords.
  • (music) To embellish.
  • Derived terms

    * go figure * prefigure * figure out (US)

    Statistics

    *

    model

    English

    (wikipedia model)

    Alternative forms

    * modell

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A person who serves as a subject for artwork or fashion, usually in the medium of photography but also for painting or drawing.
  • A person, usually an attractive female, hired to show items or goods to the public, such as items given away as prizes on a TV game show.
  • A representation of a physical object, usually in miniature.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I had my father's signet in my purse, / Which was the model of that Danish seal.
  • * Addison
  • You have the models of several ancient temples, though the temples and the gods are perished.
  • A simplified representation used to explain the workings of a real world system or event.
  • A style, type, or design.
  • The structural design of a complex system.
  • A successful example to be copied, with or without modifications.
  • He was a model of eloquence and virtue.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-22, volume=407, issue=8841, page=70, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Engineers of a different kind , passage=Private-equity nabobs bristle at being dubbed mere financiers.
  • (logic) An interpretation function which assigns a truth value to each atomic proposition.
  • (logic) An interpretation which makes a certain sentence true, in which case that interpretation is called a model of that sentence.
  • A particular style, design, or make of a particular product.
  • (manufacturing) An identifier of a product given by its manufacturer (also called model number).
  • Any copy, or resemblance, more or less exact.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Thou seest thy wretched brother die, / Who was the model of thy father's life.

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * abstract model * animal model * arbitrage pricing model * business model * causal model * commercial model * computer model * conceptual model * data model * database model * Document Object Model * economy model * enterprise architecture model * entity-relationship model * fashion model * fetish model * fitness model * glamour model * information model * late model * mark to model * mathematical model * mental model * model aircraft * model checking * model organism * model solution * model theory * modelizer * modelly * multimodel * off-model * plamodel * production model * relational model * role model * runway model * scale model * scientific model * spokesmodel * supermodel * waterfall model * water-line model * view model

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Worthy of being a model; exemplary.
  • * (rfdate), Blackwood's Magazine , volume 289, page 525:
  • At our approach the animals made so much noise that the owners of the hut peered round the door to see what was the matter; outwardly rather less model than the farm, there appeared two ancient Basques, emblematically black-bereted, gnarled [...]
  • * 1898 , John Thorburn, The St. Andrew's Society of Ottawa: 1846-1897 : sketch , page 40:
  • [...] from the land of your origin, because you demand the claims of those who believe it more model than yours, [...]
  • * 1932 , Nora Fugger, James Austin Galaston (translator), The Glory of the Habsburgs: the Memoirs of Princess Fugger , page 35:
  • Methods of game-preservation in their extensive and well-stocked hunting-grounds were as model as the huntsmanlike management of the hunts.
  • * 1934 , Charles Ryle Fay, Imperial economy and its place in the formation of economic doctrine, 1600-1932 , page 143:
  • [...] and we press with special severity on one small country whose agriculture is as model as is her way of rural life.
  • * 1956 , Stephen Rynne, All Ireland , page 54:
  • True, it is an untidy county; the farmhouses are much more model' than the farms (when we reach Antrim we shall find that the farms are more ' model than the farmhouses).
  • * 1968 , American County Government , volume 33, page 19:
  • But not all the exchanges were as model as the sergeant. Some of the exchangees showed a rigidity and reluctance to adapt.
  • * 1999 , Michael D. Williams, Acquisition for the 21st century: the F-22 Development Program , page 113:
  • It is as model as you can get.
  • * 2002 , Uma Anand Segal, A framework for immigration: Asians in the United States , page 308:
  • While Asians have been perceived as the model minority, it is increasingly clear that some Asian groups are more model than are others, and even within these model groups, a division exists [...]
  • * 2010 , Eleanor Coppola, Notes on a Life , page 140:
  • All were neat and well kept which added to the sense that they were more model than real.

    Synonyms

    * (worthy of being a model) ideal

    Verb

  • To display for others to see, especially in regard to wearing clothing while performing the role of a fashion model.
  • She modelled the shoes for her friends to see.
  • To use as an object in the creation of a forecast or model.
  • They modelled the data with a computer to analyze the experiment’s results.
  • To make a miniature model of.
  • He takes great pride in his skill at modeling airplanes.
  • To create from a substance such as clay.
  • The sculptor modelled the clay into the form of a dolphin.
  • To make a or models.
  • To be a model of any kind.
  • The actress used to model before being discovered by Hollywood.

    Synonyms

    * modelise, US modelize