Service vs Field - What's the difference?

service | field | Related terms |

Service is a related term of field.


As a noun service

is service (eg in a restaurant) or service can be service, set.

As a proper noun field is

.

service

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) (m) (French: (m)), from the verb (m) < (etyl) (m), from .

Noun

(en noun)
  • An act of being of assistance to someone.
  • I say I did him a service by ending our relationship - now he can freely pursue his career.
  • * , chapter=4
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients , passage=Then he commenced to talk, really talk. and inside of two flaps of a herring's fin he had me mesmerized, like Eben Holt's boy at the town hall show. He talked about the ills of humanity, and the glories of health and Nature and service and land knows what all.}}
  • (economics) The practice of providing such a service as economic activity.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-21, author=(Oliver Burkeman)
  • , volume=189, issue=2, page=27, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= The tao of tech , passage=The dirty secret of the internet is that all this distraction and interruption is immensely profitable. Web companies like to boast about […], or offering services that let you "stay up to date with what your friends are doing",
  • (computing) A function that is provided by one program or machine for another.
  • The state of being subordinate to or employed by an individual or group
  • The military.
  • A set of dishes or utensils.
  • (sports) The act of initially starting, or serving, the ball in play in tennis, volleyball, and other games.
  • A religious rite or ritual.
  • * , chapter=5
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Here, in the transept and choir, where the service was being held, one was conscious every moment of an increasing brightness; colours glowing vividly beneath the circular chandeliers, and the rows of small lights on the choristers' desks flashed and sparkled in front of the boys' faces, deep linen collars, and red neckbands.}}
  • (legal) The serving, or delivery, of a summons or writ.
  • * 1668 July 3, , “Thomas Rue contra'' Andrew Hou?toun” in ''The Deci?ions of the Lords of Council & Se??ion I (Edinburgh, 1683), page 548:
  • He Su?pends on the?e Rea?ons, that Thomas Rue'' had granted a general Di?charge to ''Adam Mu?het'', who was his Conjunct, and ''correus debendi'', after the alleadged Service , which Di?charged ''Mu?het'', and con?equently ''Houstoun his Partner.
  • (Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Israel, West Bank) A taxi shared among unrelated passengers, each of whom pays part of the fare; often, it has a fixed route between cities.
  • A musical composition for use in churches.
  • (obsolete) Profession of respect; acknowledgment of duty owed.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Pray, do my service to his majesty.
  • (nautical) The materials used for serving a rope, etc., such as spun yarn and small lines.
  • Usage notes
    In British English, the indefinite article “a” is often used with “good service”, as in “A good service is operating on all London Underground lines,” while this is not used in American English.
    Antonyms
    * (action or work that is produced and consumed) good * capital
    Derived terms
    * accept service * advisory service * all-up service * answering service * bond service * church service * civil service * client service * community service * curb service * customer service * debt service * denial of service * denture service * dinner service * diplomatic service * disservice * divine service * ecological service * emergency service * escort service * extension service * eyeservice * fanservice * fee-for-service * food service * foreign service * full-service * health service * ill service * in service * lip service * memorial service * military service * multiservice * national service * online service * out of service * personal service * postal service * power service * prayer service * public service * quality of service * room service * secret service * Secret Service * selective service * self-service * service area * service book * service break * service bureau * service call * service cap * service ceiling * service center * service charge * service club * service contract * service court * service dog * service door * service elevator * service line * service loop * service mark * service module * service of process * service pipe * service plaza * service provider * service road * service station * service stripe * serviceman * servicewoman * shared service * silent service * silver service * social service * substituted service * table service * tea service * unservice * unserviced * web service * wire service * yeoman's service

    Verb

    (servic)
  • To serve.
  • They service the customer base.
  • To perform maintenance.
  • He is going to service the car.
  • (transitive, agriculture, euphemistic) To inseminate through sexual intercourse
  • (vulgar) To perform a sexual act.
  • He was going to service her.
    Descendants
    * Japanese: * Korean:

    Statistics

    *

    Etymology 2

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • service tree
  • ----

    field

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A land area free of woodland, cities, and towns; open country.
  • A wide, open space that is usually used to grow crops or to hold farm animals.
  • * (Lord Byron) (1788-1824)
  • fields which promise corn and wine
  • *{{quote-book, year=1927, author= F. E. Penny
  • , chapter=5, title= Pulling the Strings , passage=Anstruther laughed good-naturedly. “[…] I shall take out half a dozen intelligent maistries from our Press and get them to give our villagers instruction when they begin work and when they are in the fields .”}}
  • The open country near or belonging to a town or city—usually used in plural.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=8 , passage=I corralled the judge, and we started off across the fields , in no very mild state of fear of that gentleman's wife, whose vigilance was seldom relaxed. And thus we came by a circuitous route to Mohair, the judge occupied by his own guilty thoughts, and I by others not less disturbing.}}
  • A physical phenomenon, such as force, potential, or fluid velocity, that pervades a region.
  • (senseid)A course of study or domain of knowledge or practice.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-05-10, author=Audrey Garric
  • , volume=188, issue=22, page=30, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Urban canopies let nature bloom , passage=As towns continue to grow, replanting vegetation has become a form of urban utopia and green roofs are spreading fast. Last year 1m square metres of plant-covered roofing was built in France, as much as in the US, and 10 times more than in Germany, the pioneer in this field .}}
  • An area that can be seen at a given time.
  • (senseid)A place where a battle is fought; a battlefield.
  • * (William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • this glorious and well-foughten field
  • * (John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • What though the field be lost?
  • An area reserved for playing a game.
  • A realm of practical, direct, or natural operation, contrasting with an office, classroom, or laboratory.
  • (senseid)(label) A commutative ring with identity for which every non element has a multiplicative inverse.
  • (label) A region containing a particular mineral.
  • (label) The background of the shield.
  • (label) An area of memory or storage reserved for a particular value.
  • A component of a database record in which a single unit of information is stored.
  • A physical or virtual location for the input of information in the form of characters.
  • The team in a match that throws the ball and tries to catch it when it is hit by the other team (the bat).
  • (label) The outfield.
  • An unrestricted or favourable opportunity for action, operation, or achievement.
  • * (1800-1859)
  • afforded a clear field for moral experiments
  • All of the competitors in any outdoor contest or trial, or all except the favourites in the betting.
  • Synonyms

    * (course of study or domain of knowledge) area, domain, sphere, realm * (area reserved for playing a game) course (for golf), court (for racquet sports), ground, pitch

    Hypernyms

    * (algebra) Euclidean domain ⊂ principal ideal domain ⊂ unique factorization domain, Noetherian domain ⊂ integral domain ⊂ commutative ring

    Hyponyms

    * (algebra) ordered field, Pythagorean field

    Derived terms

    * center field * fieldwork * field marshal * field theory * finite field * field seam * infield * left field * number field * outfield * play the field * quadratic field * right field * scalar field * semantic field * splitting field * vector field

    Usage notes

    In the mathematical sense, some languages, such as French, use a term that literally means "body". This denotes a division ring or skew field, not necessarily commutative. If it is clear from context that the quaternions and similar division rings are irrelevant, or that all division rings being considered are finite and therefore fields, this difference is ignored.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (sports) To intercept or catch (a ball) and play it.
  • (baseball, softball, cricket, and other batting sports) To be the team catching and throwing the ball, as opposed to hitting it.
  • The blue team are fielding first, while the reds are batting.
  • (sports) To place a team in (a game).
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2012 , date=August 23 , author=Alasdair Lamont , title=Hearts 0-1 Liverpool , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=On balance, it was harsh on Hearts, who had given as good as they got against their more-fancied opponents, who, despite not being at full strength, fielded a multi-million pound team.}}
    The away team field ed two new players and the second-choice goalkeeper.
  • To answer; to address.
  • She will field questions immediately after her presentation.
  • To defeat.
  • Synonyms

    * * * address, answer, deal with, respond to

    Antonyms

    * (be the team throwing and catching the ball) bat

    See also

    Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    * * *

    References

    * [http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=field&searchmode=none] - Etymology of "field"