Ferry vs Cruise - What's the difference?

ferry | cruise |


As nouns the difference between ferry and cruise

is that ferry is a ship used to transport people, smaller vehicles and goods from one port to another, usually on a regular schedule while cruise is a sea or lake voyage, especially one taken for pleasure.

As verbs the difference between ferry and cruise

is that ferry is to carry; transport; convey while cruise is (lb) to sail about, especially for pleasure.

ferry

English

Noun

(ferries)
  • A ship used to transport people, smaller vehicles and goods from one port to another, usually on a regular schedule.
  • A place where passengers are transported across water in such a ship.
  • * Milton
  • It can pass the ferry backward into light.
  • * Campbell
  • to row me o'er the ferry
  • * around 1900 , O. Henry,
  • She walked into the waiting-room of the ferry , and up the stairs, and by a marvellous swift, little run, caught the ferry-boat that was just going out.
  • The legal right or franchise that entitles a corporate body or an individual to operate such a service.
  • Derived terms

    * ferry bridge * ferry railway

    Descendants

    * French: (l) * Malay: (l) * Swahili: (l)

    Verb

    (en-verb)
  • To carry; transport; convey.
  • * 2007 , Rick Bass, The Lives of Rocks :
  • We ferried our stock in U-Haul trailers, and across the months, as we purchased more cowflesh from the Goat Man — meat vanishing into the ether again and again, as if into some quarkish void — we became familiar enough with Sloat and his daughter to learn that her name was Flozelle, and to visit with them about matters other than stock.
  • To move someone or something from one place to another, usually repeatedly.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-01, volume=407, issue=8838
  • , page=13 (Technology Quarterly), magazine=(The Economist) , title= Ideas coming down the track , passage=A “moving platform” scheme
  • To carry or transport over a contracted body of water, as a river or strait, in a boat or other floating conveyance plying between opposite shores.
  • To pass over water in a boat or by ferry.
  • * Milton
  • They ferry over this Lethean sound / Both to and fro.

    See also

    * boat * ship

    Anagrams

    * ----

    cruise

    English

    Alternative forms

    * cruize

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A sea or lake voyage, especially one taken for pleasure.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=4 , passage=Judge Short had gone to town, and Farrar was off for a three days' cruise up the lake. I was bitterly regretting I had not gone with him when the distant notes of a coach horn reached my ear, and I descried a four-in-hand winding its way up the inn road from the direction of Mohair.}}

    Derived terms

    * cruise control * cruise missile * cruise ship * cruiser * cruisey/cruisy * cruisewear * pleasure cruise

    Verb

    (cruis)
  • (lb) To sail about, especially for pleasure.
  • *
  • *:He and Gerald usually challenged the rollers in a sponson canoe when Gerald was there for the weekend; or, when Lansing came down, the two took long swims seaward or cruised about in Gerald's dory, clad in their swimming-suits; and Selwyn's youth became renewed in a manner almost ridiculous,.
  • (lb) To travel at constant speed for maximum operating efficiency.
  • (lb) To move about an area leisurely in the hope of discovering something, or looking for custom.
  • To actively seek a romantic partner or casual sexual partner by moving about a particular area; to troll.
  • To walk while holding on to an object (stage in development of ambulation, typically occurring at 10 months).
  • To win easily and convincingly.
  • :
  • Derived terms

    *

    Anagrams

    * ----