Feeling vs Pang - What's the difference?

feeling | pang |


As nouns the difference between feeling and pang

is that feeling is sensation, particularly through the skin while pang is (often|pluralized) paroxysm of extreme physical pain or anguish; sudden and transitory agony;throe.

As verbs the difference between feeling and pang

is that feeling is (feel) while pang is to torment; to torture; to cause to have great pain or suffering.

As a adjective feeling

is emotionally sensitive.

feeling

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • Emotionally sensitive.
  • Despite the rough voice, the coach is surprisingly feeling .
  • Expressive of great sensibility; attended by, or evincing, sensibility.
  • He made a feeling representation of his wrongs.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Sensation, particularly through the skin.
  • The wool on my arm produced a strange feeling .
  • Emotion; impression.
  • The house gave me a feeling of dread.
  • Emotional state or well-being.
  • You really hurt my feelings when you said that.
  • Emotional attraction or desire.
  • Many people still have feelings for their first love.
  • Intuition.
  • He has no feeling for what he can say to somebody in such a fragile emotional condition.
  • * 1987 ,
  • Got on a lucky one
    Came in eighteen to one
    I've got a feeling
    This year's for me and you
    I've got a funny feeling that this isn't going to work.
  • An opinion, an attitude.
  • *
  • Derived terms

    * fellow feeling * hard feelings * hurt feelings

    Verb

    (head)
  • Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    * * ----

    pang

    English

    (Webster 1913)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (often, pluralized) paroxysm of extreme physical pain or anguish; sudden and transitory agony; throe
  • * 1591 , , Henry VI, Part II , act 3, sc. 3,
  • See, how the pangs of death do make him grin!
  • * 1888 , , "The Nightingale and the Rose" in The Happy Prince and Other Tales ,
  • So the Nightingale pressed closer against the thorn, and the thorn touched her heart, and a fierce pang of pain shot through her.
  • (often, pluralized) A sharp, sudden feeling of a mental or emotional nature, as of joy or sorrow
  • * 1867 , , The Guardian Angel , ch. 7,
  • He was startled with a piece of information which gave him such an exquisite pang of delight that he could hardly keep the usual quiet of his demeanor.

    Verb

  • to torment; to torture; to cause to have great pain or suffering
  • * 1918 , , "On Unanswering Letters" in Mince Pie ,
  • It panged him so to say good-bye when he had to leave.