Feeble vs Valetudinarianism - What's the difference?

feeble | valetudinarianism |


As an adjective feeble

is deficient in physical strength; weak; infirm; debilitated.

As a verb feeble

is (obsolete) to make feeble; to enfeeble.

As a noun valetudinarianism is

the condition of a valetudinarian; a state of feeble health; infirmity.

feeble

English

Adjective

(er)
  • Deficient in physical strength; weak; infirm; debilitated.
  • Though she appeared old and feeble , she could still throw a ball.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=October 23 , author=Tom Fordyce , title=2011 Rugby World Cup final: New Zealand 8-7 France , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=France were transformed from the feeble , divided unit that had squeaked past Wales in the semi-final, their half-backs finding the corners with beautifully judged kicks from hand, the forwards making yards with every drive and a reorganised Kiwi line-out beginning to malfunction.}}
  • Lacking force, vigor, or efficiency in action or expression; faint.
  • That was a feeble excuse for an example.

    Synonyms

    * (physically weak) weak, infirm, debilitated * faint

    Derived terms

    * enfeeble * feebleness * feeble-minded * feebly

    Verb

    (feebl)
  • (obsolete) To make feeble; to enfeeble.
  • References

    * *

    valetudinarianism

    English

    Noun

    (-)
  • The condition of a valetudinarian; a state of feeble health; infirmity.
  • References

    *