Kedge vs Fedge - What's the difference?

kedge | fedge |


As nouns the difference between kedge and fedge

is that kedge is (nautical) a small anchor used for warping a vessel; (also called a kedge anchor) while fedge is a fence made up of living plants, especially willow, thus somewhat resembling a hedge.

As a verb kedge

is to warp (a vessel) by carrying out a kedge in a boat, dropping it overboard, and hauling the vessel up to it.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

kedge

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • (nautical) A small anchor used for warping a vessel; (also called a kedge anchor).
  • * 1896 , , "Young Tom Bowling":
  • The chaps who had gone off in the cutter had been equally spry with their job, bending on a stout hemp hawser through the ring of the kedge anchor, which they dropped some half a cable's length from the brig, bringing back the other end aboard, where it was put round the capstan on the forecastle.
  • (Yorkshire) A glutton.
  • Verb

    (kedg)
  • To warp (a vessel) by carrying out a kedge in a boat, dropping it overboard, and hauling the vessel up to it.
  • (of a vessel) To move with the help of a kedge, as described above.
  • * 1911 , , "Overdue":
  • there was a stretch of twelve miles of channel running in a north-easterly direction which the ship could not possibly negotiate under sail unless a change of wind should occur ā€” of which there seemed to be absolutely no prospect. The only alternative, therefore, would be to kedge those twelve miles; truly a most formidable undertaking for four persons ā€” one of them being a girl ā€” to attempt.

    fedge

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A fence made up of living plants, especially willow, thus somewhat resembling a hedge.
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