Fatigue vs Weary - What's the difference?

fatigue | weary |


As verbs the difference between fatigue and weary

is that fatigue is to tire or make weary by physical or mental exertion while weary is to make or to become weary.

As a noun fatigue

is a weariness caused by exertion; exhaustion.

As a adjective weary is

having the strength exhausted by toil or exertion; tired; fatigued.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

fatigue

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A weariness caused by exertion; exhaustion.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2012 , date=December 29 , author=Paul Doyle , title=Arsenal's Theo Walcott hits hat-trick in thrilling victory over Newcastle , work=The Guardian citation , page= , passage=Alan Pardew finished by far the most frustrated man at the Emirates, blaming fatigue for the fact that Arsenal were able to kill his team off in the dying minutes.}}
  • A menial task, especially in the military.
  • (engineering) A mechanism of material failure involving of crack growth caused by low-stress cyclic loading.
  • * 2013 , N. Dowling, Mechanical Behaviour of Materials , page 399
  • Mechanical failures due to fatigue have been the subject of engineering efforts for more than 150 years.

    Synonyms

    *

    Derived terms

    * fatigues (military work clothing)

    Verb

    (fatigu)
  • to tire or make weary by physical or mental exertion
  • to lose so much strength or energy that one becomes tired, weary, feeble or exhausted
  • (intransitive, engineering, of a material specimen) to undergo the process of fatigue; to fail as a result of fatigue.
  • weary

    English

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Having the strength exhausted by toil or exertion; tired; fatigued.
  • :
  • *1623 , (William Shakespeare), (As You Like It) , :
  • *:I care not for my spirits if my legs were not weary .
  • *(Henry Wadsworth Longfellow) (1807-1882)
  • *:[I] am weary , thinking of your task.
  • *
  • *:There was a neat hat-and-umbrella stand, and the stranger's weary feet fell soft on a good, serviceable dark-red drugget, which matched in colour the flock-paper on the walls.
  • Having one's patience, relish, or contentment exhausted; tired; sick.
  • :
  • Expressive of fatigue.
  • :
  • Causing weariness; tiresome.
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:weary way
  • *(Samuel Taylor Coleridge) (1772-1834)
  • *:There passed a weary time.
  • Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * wearily * weariness * wearisome

    Verb

    (en-verb)
  • To make or to become weary.
  • * Shakespeare (Julius Caesar )
  • So shall he waste his means, weary his soldiers,
  • * Milton
  • I would not cease / To weary him with my assiduous cries.
  • * 1898 , , (Moonfleet) Chapter 4
  • Yet there was no time to be lost if I was ever to get out alive, and so I groped with my hands against the side of the grave until I made out the bottom edge of the slab, and then fell to grubbing beneath it with my fingers. But the earth, which the day before had looked light and loamy to the eye, was stiff and hard enough when one came to tackle it with naked hands, and in an hour's time I had done little more than further weary myself and bruise my fingers.

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * (l)

    See also

    * wary English ergative verbs