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Result vs False - What's the difference?

result | false |

As a verb result

is to proceed, spring or rise, as a consequence, from facts, arguments, premises, combination of circumstances, consultation, thought or endeavor.

As a noun result

is that which results; the conclusion or end to which any course or condition of things leads, or which is obtained by any process or operation; consequence or effect.

As an interjection result

is (uk) an exclamation of joy following a favorable outcome.

As an adjective false is

(label) one of two states of a boolean variable; logic.

result

English

Verb

(en verb) (intransitive)
  • To proceed, spring or rise, as a consequence, from facts, arguments, premises, combination of circumstances, consultation, thought or endeavor.
  • * Tillotson
  • Pleasure and peace do naturally result from a holy and good life.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=October 23, author=Phil McNulty, work=BBC Sport
  • , title= Man Utd 1-6 Man City , passage=United's hopes of mounting a serious response suffered a blow within two minutes of the restart when Evans, who had endured a miserable afternoon, lost concentration and allowed Balotelli to steal in behind him. The defender's only reaction was to haul the Italian down, resulting in an inevitable red card.}}
  • To come out, or have an issue; to terminate; to have consequences; followed by in .
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= Katrina G. Claw
  • , title= Rapid Evolution in Eggs and Sperm , volume=101, issue=3, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=In plants, the ability to recognize self from nonself plays an important role in fertilization, because self-fertilization will result in less diverse offspring than fertilization with pollen from another individual.}}
  • (legal) To return to the proprietor (or heirs) after a reversion.
  • (obsolete) To leap back; to rebound.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • the huge round stone, resulting with a bound

    Synonyms

    * follow, arise

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • That which results; the conclusion or end to which any course or condition of things leads, or which is obtained by any process or operation; consequence or effect.
  • * {{quote-magazine, title=No hiding place
  • , date=2013-05-25, volume=407, issue=8837, page=74, magazine=(The Economist) citation , passage=In America alone, people spent $170 billion on “direct marketing”—junk mail of both the physical and electronic varieties—last year. Yet of those who received unsolicited adverts through the post, only 3% bought anything as a result . If the bumf arrived electronically, the take-up rate was 0.1%. And for online adverts the “conversion” into sales was a minuscule 0.01%.}}
  • The fruit, beneficial or tangible effect(s) achieved by effort.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=1 , passage=The stories did not seem to me to touch life. They were plainly intended to have a bracing moral effect, and perhaps had this result for the people at whom they were aimed.}}
  • The decision or determination of a council or deliberative assembly; a resolve; a decree.
  • * (John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • Then of their session ended they bid cry / With trumpet's regal sound the great result .
  • (label) A flying back; resilience.
  • * (Francis Bacon) (1561-1626)
  • Sound is produced between the string and the air by the return or the result of the string.
  • (label) The final score in a game.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1935, author= George Goodchild
  • , title=Death on the Centre Court, chapter=3 , passage=It had been his intention to go to Wimbledon, but as he himself said: “Why be blooming well frizzled when you can hear all the results' over the wireless. And ' results are all that concern me. […]”}}
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=September 24, author=David Ornstein, title=Arsenal 3 - 0 Bolton
  • , work=BBC Sport citation , passage=The Gunners boss has been heavily criticised for his side's poor start to the Premier League season but this result helps lift the pressure.}}
  • (label) A positive or favourable outcome for someone.
  • Derived terms

    * as a result * resultful * resultless

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • (UK) An exclamation of joy following a favorable outcome.
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • * 2010 April 10, Amy Pond, in The Beast Below (series 5, episode 2), written by Steven Moffat:
  • (picking a lock) I wonder what I did...
    (the lock opens) Hey hey, result !

    Statistics

    *

    false

    English

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Untrue, not factual, factually incorrect.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1551, year_published=1888
  • , title= A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles: Founded Mainly on the Materials Collected by the Philological Society , section=Part 1, publisher=Clarendon Press, location=Oxford, editor= , volume=1, page=217 , passage=Also the rule of false position, with dyuers examples not onely vulgar, but some appertaynyng to the rule of Algeber.}}
  • Based on factually incorrect premises: false legislation
  • Spurious, artificial.
  • :
  • *
  • *:At her invitation he outlined for her the succeeding chapters with terse military accuracy?; and what she liked best and best understood was avoidance of that false modesty which condescends, turning technicality into pabulum.
  • (lb) Of a state in Boolean logic that indicates a negative result.
  • Uttering falsehood; dishonest or deceitful.
  • :
  • Not faithful or loyal, as to obligations, allegiance, vows, etc.; untrue; treacherous.
  • :
  • *(John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • *:I to myself was false , ere thou to me.
  • Not well founded; not firm or trustworthy; erroneous.
  • :
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:whose false foundation waves have swept away
  • Not essential or permanent, as parts of a structure which are temporary or supplemental.
  • (lb) Out of tune.
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • One of two options on a true-or-false test.
  • Synonyms

    * * See also

    Antonyms

    * (untrue) real, true

    Derived terms

    * false attack * false dawn * false friend * falsehood * falseness * falsify * falsity

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • Not truly; not honestly; falsely.
  • * Shakespeare
  • You play me false .

    Anagrams

    * * 1000 English basic words ----