Recked vs False - What's the difference?

recked | false |


As a verb recked

is (reck).

As an adjective false is

(label) one of two states of a boolean variable; logic.

recked

English

Verb

(head)
  • (reck)
  • Anagrams

    *

    reck

    English

    Alternative forms

    * (l) (obsolete)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To make account of; to care for; to heed; to regard; consider.
  • * Sir Philip Sidney
  • this son of mine not recking danger
  • * Burns
  • And may you better reck the rede / Than ever did the adviser.
  • * 1603 , William Shakespeare, "The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark", Act 1, Scene 3:
  • Ophelia:
    Do not, as some ungracious pastors do,
    Show me the steep and thorny way to heaven,
    Whiles, like a puffed and reckless libertine,
    Himself the primrose path of dalliance treads,
    And recks not his own rede.
  • *
  • * 1922 , (James Joyce), Chapter 13
  • Little recked he perhaps for what she felt, that dull aching void in her heart sometimes, piercing to the core.
  • To care; to matter.
  • * 1822 , John E. Hall (ed.), The Port Folio , vol. XIV
  • Little thou reck'st [2] of this sad store!
    Would thou might never reck [1] them more!
  • * 1900 , , Villanelle of Marguerite's , lines 10-11
  • *:She knows us not, nor recks if she enthrall
  • *:With voice and eyes and fashion of her hair
  • To concern, to be important
  • It recks not!
  • * Milton
  • What recks it them?
  • (obsolete) To think.
  • Derived terms

    * (l) * reckless

    false

    English

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Untrue, not factual, factually incorrect.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1551, year_published=1888
  • , title= A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles: Founded Mainly on the Materials Collected by the Philological Society , section=Part 1, publisher=Clarendon Press, location=Oxford, editor= , volume=1, page=217 , passage=Also the rule of false position, with dyuers examples not onely vulgar, but some appertaynyng to the rule of Algeber.}}
  • Based on factually incorrect premises: false legislation
  • Spurious, artificial.
  • :
  • *
  • *:At her invitation he outlined for her the succeeding chapters with terse military accuracy?; and what she liked best and best understood was avoidance of that false modesty which condescends, turning technicality into pabulum.
  • (lb) Of a state in Boolean logic that indicates a negative result.
  • Uttering falsehood; dishonest or deceitful.
  • :
  • Not faithful or loyal, as to obligations, allegiance, vows, etc.; untrue; treacherous.
  • :
  • *(John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • *:I to myself was false , ere thou to me.
  • Not well founded; not firm or trustworthy; erroneous.
  • :
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:whose false foundation waves have swept away
  • Not essential or permanent, as parts of a structure which are temporary or supplemental.
  • (lb) Out of tune.
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • One of two options on a true-or-false test.
  • Synonyms

    * * See also

    Antonyms

    * (untrue) real, true

    Derived terms

    * false attack * false dawn * false friend * falsehood * falseness * falsify * falsity

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • Not truly; not honestly; falsely.
  • * Shakespeare
  • You play me false .

    Anagrams

    * * 1000 English basic words ----