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Locate vs False - What's the difference?

locate | false |

As a verb locate

is to place; to set in a particular spot or position.

As an adjective false is

(label) one of two states of a boolean variable; logic.

locate

English

Verb

(locat)
  • To place; to set in a particular spot or position.
  • *
  • The captives and emigrants whom he brought with him were located in the trans-Tiberine quarter.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-22, volume=407, issue=8841, page=68, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= T time , passage=The ability to shift profits to low-tax countries by locating intellectual property in them, which is then licensed to related businesses in high-tax countries, is often assumed to be the preserve of high-tech companies.}}
  • To find out where something is located.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author=Kevin Heng
  • , volume=101, issue=3, page=184, magazine=(American Scientist) , title= Why Does Nature Form Exoplanets Easily? , passage=In the past two years, NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope has located nearly 3,000 exoplanet candidates ranging from sub-Earth-sized minions to gas giants that dwarf our own Jupiter. Their densities range from that of styrofoam to iron.}}
  • *
  • The Bat—they called him the Bat.. Most lone wolves had a moll at any rate—women were their ruin—but if the Bat had a moll, not even the grapevine telegraph could locate her.
  • To designate the site or place of; to define the limits of; as, to locate' a public building; to '''locate''' a mining claim; to '''locate (the land granted by) a land warrant (''Note : the designation may be purely descriptive: it need not be prescriptive.)
  • * (Herbert Spencer)
  • That part of the body in which the sense of touch is located .
  • (colloquial) To place one's self; to take up one's residence; to settle.(intransitive)
  • Anagrams

    * (l) ----

    false

    English

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Untrue, not factual, factually incorrect.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1551, year_published=1888
  • , title= A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles: Founded Mainly on the Materials Collected by the Philological Society , section=Part 1, publisher=Clarendon Press, location=Oxford, editor= , volume=1, page=217 , passage=Also the rule of false position, with dyuers examples not onely vulgar, but some appertaynyng to the rule of Algeber.}}
  • Based on factually incorrect premises: false legislation
  • Spurious, artificial.
  • :
  • *
  • *:At her invitation he outlined for her the succeeding chapters with terse military accuracy?; and what she liked best and best understood was avoidance of that false modesty which condescends, turning technicality into pabulum.
  • (lb) Of a state in Boolean logic that indicates a negative result.
  • Uttering falsehood; dishonest or deceitful.
  • :
  • Not faithful or loyal, as to obligations, allegiance, vows, etc.; untrue; treacherous.
  • :
  • *(John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • *:I to myself was false , ere thou to me.
  • Not well founded; not firm or trustworthy; erroneous.
  • :
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:whose false foundation waves have swept away
  • Not essential or permanent, as parts of a structure which are temporary or supplemental.
  • (lb) Out of tune.
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • One of two options on a true-or-false test.
  • Synonyms

    * * See also

    Antonyms

    * (untrue) real, true

    Derived terms

    * false attack * false dawn * false friend * falsehood * falseness * falsify * falsity

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • Not truly; not honestly; falsely.
  • * Shakespeare
  • You play me false .

    Anagrams

    * * 1000 English basic words ----