Come vs Fall - What's the difference?

come | fall |


As verbs the difference between come and fall

is that come is to (to consume food) while fall is .

come

English

(wikipedia come)

Verb

  • (label) To move from further away to nearer to.
  • * (William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • Look, who comes yonder?
  • * (1809-1892)
  • I did not come to curse thee.
  • # To move towards the speaker.
  • # To move towards the listener.
  • # To move towards the object that is the of the sentence.
  • # (label) To move towards the or subject of the main clause.
  • # To move towards an unstated agent.
  • (label) To arrive.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=5 , passage=Then came a maid with hand-bag and shawls, and after her a tall young lady. She stood for a moment holding her skirt above the grimy steps,
  • (label) To appear, to manifest itself.
  • * (1613-1680), (Hudibras)
  • when butter does refuse to come [i.e. to form]
  • (label) To take a position to something else in a sequence.
  • To achieve orgasm; to cum.
  • To approach a state of being or accomplishment.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=3 , passage=Now all this was very fine, but not at all in keeping with the Celebrity's character as I had come' to conceive it. The idea that adulation ever cloyed on him was ludicrous in itself. In fact I thought the whole story fishy, and ' came very near to saying so.}}
  • To take a particular approach or point of view in regard to something.
  • To become, to turn out to be.
  • * (William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • How come you thus estranged?
  • (label) To be supplied, or made available; to exist.
  • (label) To carry through; to succeed in.
  • (label) Happen.
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2014-06-14, volume=411, issue=8891, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= It's a gas , passage=But out of sight is out of mind. And that
  • To have a social background.
  • # To be or have been a resident or native.
  • # To have been brought up by or employed by.
  • To germinate.
  • Usage notes

    In its general sense, come'' specifically marks motion towards the (whether explicitly stated or not). Its counterpart, usually referring to motion away from or not involving the deictic centre, is ''go''. For example, the sentence "Come to the tree" implies contextually that the speaker is already at the tree - "Go to the tree" often implies that the speaker is elsewhere. Either the speaker or the listener can be the deictic centre - the sentences "I will go to you" and "I will come to you" are both valid, depending on the exact nuances of the context. When there is no clear speaker or listener, the deictic centre is usually the focus of the sentence or the topic of the piece of writing. "Millions of people came''' to America from Europe" would be used in an article about America, but "Millions of people ' went to America from Europe" would be used in an article about Europe. When used with adverbs of location, come'' is usually paired with ''here'' or ''hither''. In interrogatives, ''come'' usually indicates a question about source - "Where are you coming from?" - while ''go indicates a question about destination - "Where are you going?" or "Where are you going to?" A few old texts use comen as the past participle. The phrase "dream come true" is a set phrase; the verb "come" in the sense "become" is archaic outside of that set phrase and the collocation "come about". The collocations “come with” and “come along” mean accompany, used as “Do you want to come with me?” and “Do you want to come along?” In the Midwestern American dialect, “come with” can occur without a following object, as in “Do you want to come with?” In this dialect, “with” can also be used in this way with some other verbs, such as “take with”. Examples of this may be found in plays by Chicagoan (David Mamet), such as (American Buffalo). Chicago Dialect This objectless use is not permissible in other dialects.

    Antonyms

    *

    Derived terms

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    See also

    * cam'st * kingdom come

    Noun

    (-)
  • (obsolete) Coming, arrival; approach.
  • * 1869 , RD Blackmoore, Lorna Doone , II:
  • “If we count three before the come of thee, thwacked thou art, and must go to the women.”
  • (slang) Semen, or female ejaculatory discharge.
  • See also

    * cum

    Preposition

    (English prepositions)
  • Leave it to settle for about three months and, come Christmas time, you'll have a delicious concoctions to offer your guests.
    Come retirement, their Social Security may turn out to be a lot less than they counted on.
  • * '>citation
  • Come the final whistle, Mikel Arteta lay flabbergasted on the turf.

    Usage notes

    * is often used when both the indicated event, period or change in state occurred in the past.

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • An exclamation to express annoyance.
  • :
  • An exclamation to express encouragement, or to precede a request.
  • :
  • *
  • *:“I'm through with all pawn-games,” I laughed. “Come , let us have a game of lansquenet. Either I will take a farewell fall out of you or you will have your sevenfold revenge”.
  • References

    fall

    English

    (wikipedia fall)

    Verb

  • To move downwards.
  • #To move to a lower position under the effect of gravity.
  • #:
  • #*
  • #*:There was a neat hat-and-umbrella stand, and the stranger's weary feet fell soft on a good, serviceable dark-red drugget, which matched in colour the flock-paper on the walls.
  • #To come down, to drop or descend.
  • #:
  • #*1920 , (Herman Cyril McNeile), (Bulldog Drummond) , Ch.1:
  • #*:Her eyes fell on the table, and she advanced into the room wiping her hands on her apron.
  • #To come to the ground deliberately, to prostrate oneself.
  • #:
  • #To be brought to the ground.
  • (lb) To be moved downwards.
  • #(lb) To let fall; to drop.
  • #*(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • #*:For every tear he falls , a Trojan bleeds.
  • #(lb) To sink; to depress.
  • #:
  • # To fell; to cut down.
  • #:
  • (lb) To happen, to change negatively.
  • #(lb) To become.
  • #:
  • #To occur (on a certain day of the week, date, or similar); (said of an instance of a recurring event such as a holiday or date).
  • #:
  • #(lb) To collapse; to be overthrown or defeated.
  • #:
  • # To die, especially in battle or by disease.
  • #:
  • #(lb) To become lower (in quantity, pitch, etc.).
  • #:
  • #*Sir (c.1569-1626)
  • #*:The greatness of these Irish lords suddenly fell and vanished.
  • #*1835 , Sir , Sir (James Clark Ross), Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-west Passage …, Vol.1 , pp.284-5:
  • #*:Towards the following morning, the thermometer fell to 5°; and at daylight, there was not an atom of water to be seen in any direction.
  • #*{{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-20, volume=408, issue=8845, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Old soldiers? , passage=Whether modern, industrial man is less or more warlike than his hunter-gatherer ancestors is impossible to determine.
  • #(lb) To become; to be affected by or befallen with a calamity; to change into the state described by words following; to become prostrated literally or figuratively .
  • #:
  • (lb) To be allotted to; to arrive through chance, fate, or inheritance.
  • :
  • *(Alexander Pope) (1688-1744)
  • *:If to her share some female errors fall , / Look on her face, and you'll forget them all.
  • To diminish; to lessen or lower.
  • * (John Locke) (1632-1705)
  • *:Upon lessening interest to four per cent, you fall the price of your native commodities.
  • To bring forth.
  • :
  • :(Shakespeare)
  • To issue forth into life; to be brought forth; said of the young of certain animals.
  • :(Shakespeare)
  • To descend in character or reputation; to become degraded; to sink into vice, error, or sin.
  • *(Bible)}, (w) iv.11:
  • *:Let us labour therefore to enter into that rest, lest any man fall after the same example of unbelief.
  • To become ensnared or entrapped; to be worse off than before.
  • :
  • To assume a look of shame or disappointment; to become or appear dejected; said of the face.
  • *(Bible), (w) iv.5:
  • *:Cain was very wroth, and his countenance fell .
  • *(Joseph Addison) (1672–1719)
  • *:I have observed of late thy looks are fallen .
  • To happen; to come to pass; to chance or light (upon).
  • *(Jonathan Swift) (1667–1745)
  • *:The Romans fell on this model by chance.
  • *(Bible), (w) iii.18:
  • *:Sit still, my daughter, until thou know how the matter will fall .
  • *(Herbert Spenser) (1820-1903)
  • *:Primitive mendo not make laws, they fall into customs.
  • To begin with haste, ardour, or vehemence; to rush or hurry.
  • :
  • *(Benjamin Jowett) (1817-1893) ((Thucydides))
  • *:They now no longer doubted, but fell to work heart and soul.
  • To be dropped or uttered carelessly.
  • :
  • Quotations

    * , Andrew Wi?e (publisher, 1598 — second quarto), Act V, Scene 3: *: Ghoa?t [of Clarence]. / To morrow in the battaile thinke on me, / And fall thy edgele??e ?word, di?paire and die.

    Synonyms

    * (move to a lower position under the effect of gravity) drop, plummet, plunge * (come down) come down, descend, drop * (come to the ground deliberately) drop, lower oneself, prostrate oneself * (be brought to the ground) * : be beaten by, be defeated by, be overthrown by, be smitten by, be vanquished by, * (die) die * (be allotted to) be the responsibility of, be up to * : dip, drop * (become) become, get * : cut down (of a tree), fell, knock down, knock over, strike down

    Antonyms

    * (come down) ascend, go up, rise * (come to the ground deliberately) get up, pick oneself up, stand up * : beat, defeat, overthrow, smite, vanquish * : rise

    Derived terms

    * the apple does not fall far from the tree * the * the curtain falls * fair fall * fallable * fall aboard * fall aboard of * fall about * fall about someone's ears * fall abreast of * fall abroad of * fall across * fall adown * fall afire * fall afoul * fall afoul of * fall after * fallage * fall all over someone or oneself * fall among * fall apart * fall asleep * fall aslope * fall astern * fall asunder * fall at * fall at the crest * fall at the first fence, fall at the first hurdle * fall away * fall back * * fall back on, fall back upon * fall behind, fall behindhand * fall between the cracks * fall between two stools * fall by * fall by the wayside * fall calm * fall dead * fall down * fall down on * fall due * fallen * faller * fall flat * fall flat on one's face * fall for * fall forth * fall foul * fall foul of, fall foul with * fall from * fall from grace * fall heir * fall home * fall ill * fall in * fall in age * fall in flesh * fall in for * falling * fall in line * fall in love * fall in mold, fall in mould * fall in one's road * fall in one's way * fall in somebody's heart, fall in someone's heart * fall in somebody's mind, fall in someone's mind * fall into one's hands * fall into one's lap * fall in two * fall in upon * fall in with * fall into * fall into line * fall into place * fall into somebody's heart, fall into someone's heart * fall into somebody's mind, fall into someone's mind * fall of * fall off * fall off the turnip truck * fall on * fall on board * fall on deaf ears * fall one's crest * fall on one's face * fall on one's feet * fall on shore * fall on sleep * fall on one's knees * fall on one's sword * fall on the crest * fall open * fall out * fall out in * fall out of * fall out upon * fall out with * fall over * fall over oneself * fall over one's feet * fall pregnant * fall prey to * fall short * fall short of * fall short to * fall sick * fall silent * fallstreaks, fallstreifen * fall through * fall through the cracks * fall to * fall to be * fall together * fall to loggerheads * fall to mold, fall to mould * fall to oneself * fall to one's knees * fall to one's lot * fall to one's share * fall to pieces * fall to powder * fall to the ground * fall under * fall unto * fall upon * fall victim to * fall what can fall, fall what will fall * fall with * fall within * foul fall * let fall * let the chips fall where they may * may fall, may-fall * misfall * overfall * the rain in Spain falls mainly in the plain * refall * tendency of the rate of profit to fall * to-fall * under-fall *

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The act of moving to a lower position under the effect of gravity.
  • A reduction in quantity, pitch, etc.
  • *
  • *:“I'm through with all pawn-games,” I laughed. “Come, let us have a game of lansquenet. Either I will take a farewell fall out of you or you will have your sevenfold revenge”.
  • A loss of greatness or status.
  • (label) A crucial event or circumstance.
  • # The action of a batsman being out.
  • # (label) A defect in the ice which causes stones thrown into an area to drift in a given direction.
  • # (label) An instance of a wrestler being pinned to the mat.
  • Blame or punishment for a failure or misdeed.
  • The part of the rope of a tackle to which the power is applied in hoisting.
  • See'' falls'''
  • An old Scots unit of measure equal to six ells.
  • Synonyms

    * (act of moving to a lower position) descent, drop * (reduction) decrease, dip, drop, lowering, reduction * (season) autumn * (loss of greatness or status) downfall * rap

    Antonyms

    * (act of moving to a lower position under the effect of gravity) ascent, rise * (reduction) increase, rise * (loss of greatness or status) ascent, rise

    Derived terms

    * accidental fall * angle of fall * ash fall, ashfall * backfall * best-of-three-falls match * block and fall * break a fall * break-fall, breakfall * break one's fall * byfall * catfall * center of falls, centre of falls * chainfall * crossfall * darkfall * dead fall, dead-fall, deadfall * dew-fall, dewfall * dog-fall, dogfall * downfall * dustfall * earthfall * even-fall, evenfall * fall-and-rise phenomenon * fall armyworm * fall and tackle * fall block, fall-block * fall-blooming * fall-board, fallboard * fall-breaker * fall-bridge * fall cankerworm * (Fall Classic) * fall-cloud * fall colors * fall dandelion * fall-door * fall duck * fall equinox * fall factor * fall-fish, fallfish * fall foliage * fall-forward * fall from grace * fall front * fall-front desk * fall guy, fall-guy * fall herring * fall-iron door * fall-leaf * fall-less * fall line, fall-line * fall money * The (Fall of Baghdad) * The (Fall of Constantinople) * fall of day * the (w) * the Fall of Man, the fall of man * The (Fall of Saigon) * fall of the leaf * fall of the perch * the (w), the (Fall of Rome) * fall of wicket * fall overturn * fall-pipe * fall-pippin * fall rate * fall-rise * fall-rope * fall-run fish * falls * (Falls-to-Falls Corridor) * fall time * fall-trap * fall turnover * fall-way * fall webworm * fall wind, fall-wind * fall-window * fall-wood * fally * fall zone * fish fall * foot-fall, footfall * free fall * give a fall * ice fall, ice-fall * infall * jaw-fall, jawfall * landfall * law-fall * leaf-fall * litterfall * mid-fall, midfall * misfall * mouse-fall * near-fall * nightfall * offal * onfall * outfall * overfall * parachute landing fall * pinfall * pitfall * planetfall * prat-fall, pratfall, pratt-fall * pressure-fall center, pressure-fall centre * pride comes before a fall, pride goes before a fall, pride goeth before a fall * proudfall * rainfall * ride for a fall * rises and falls * rock-fall, rockfall * roof fall * root-fall * shake a fall * shout-and-fall * slip and fall * smokefall * snow-fall, snowfall * speck falls * stiff board fall * sunfall * Swedish fall * tackle fall * take the fall * technical fall * terminal fall velocity * threadfall * throughfall * toe drain and outfall * trad fall * trap-fall, trapfall * try a fall * two-out-of-three-falls match * underfall * waterfall * whale fall * windfall * withfall * wrestle a fall * zipper fall

    See also

    * falls * [http://hea-www.harvard.edu/ECT/Words/
  • fall]