Aired vs Faired - What's the difference?

aired | faired |


As verbs the difference between aired and faired

is that aired is (air) while faired is (fair).

aired

English

Verb

(head)
  • (air)
  • Anagrams

    * * *

    air

    English

    Noun

  • (uncountable, historical, astrology, alchemy, science) The atmospheric substance above the surface of the earth which animals breathe, formerly considered to be a single substance, one of the four basic elements of ancient philosophy and one of the five basic elements of Eastern traditions.
  • (uncountable, physics, meteorology) That substance, now understood as the mixture of gases comprising the earth's atmosphere.
  • (usually, with the) The apparently open space above the ground; the mass of this substance around the earth.
  • A breeze; a gentle wind.
  • A feeling or sense.
  • * November 2 2014 , Daniel Taylor, " Sergio Agüero strike wins derby for Manchester City against 10-man United," guardian.co.uk
  • Smalling’s quick one-two of yellow cards towards the end of the first half had left an air of inevitability about what would follow and, if anything, it was probably a surprise that City restricted themselves to Sergio Agüero’s goal bearing in mind another of United’s defenders, Marcos Rojo, was taken off on a stretcher early in the second half with a dislocated shoulder.
  • * 1900 , , (The House Behind the Cedars) , Chapter I,
  • The girl stooped to pluck a rose, and as she bent over it, her profile was clearly outlined. She held the flower to her face with a long-drawn inhalation, then went up the steps, crossed the piazza, opened the door without knocking, and entered the house with the air of one thoroughly at home.
  • A sense of poise, graciousness, or quality.
  • * 1815 , (Jane Austen), (Emma) , :
  • "He is very plain, undoubtedly--remarkably plain:--but that is nothing compared with his entire want of gentility. I had no right to expect much, and I did not expect much; but I had no idea that he could be so very clownish, so totally without air . I had imagined him, I confess, a degree or two nearer gentility."
  • (usually plural) Pretension]]; [[snobby, snobbishness; pretence that one is better than others.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1922, author=(Ben Travers), title=(A Cuckoo in the Nest)
  • , chapter=1 citation , passage=He read the letter aloud. Sophia listened with the studied air of one for whom, even in these days, a title possessed some surreptitious allurement.}}
  • (music) A song, especially a solo; an aria.
  • * 1813 , (Jane Austen), (Pride and Prejudice) , :
  • "If I," said Mr. Collins, "were so fortunate as to be able to sing, I should have great pleasure, I am sure, in obliging the company with an air ; for I consider music as a very innocent diversion, and perfectly compatible with the profession of a clergyman"
  • (informal) Nothing; absence of anything.
  • An air conditioner or the processed air it produces. Can be a mass noun or a count noun depending on context; similar to hair .
  • (obsolete, chemistry) Any specific gas.
  • (snowboarding, skateboarding, motor sports) A jump in which one becomes airborne.
  • Synonyms

    * * atmosphere * aura * nimbus

    Derived terms

    * airbag * air base * air bed * airborne * air bounce * airbrake * airbrush * air bubble * airbus * air cargo * air carrier * air chamber * Air Chief Marshal * air cleaner * Air Commodore * air compressor * air-conditioned * air-conditioner * air-conditioning * air-cooled * air corridor * aircraft * aircrew * air cushion * air display * airdrome * airdrop * air duct * airfield * air flow * air force * airframe * air freight * air freshener * air guitar * airgun * air hole * air hostess * airing cupboard * air intake * air lane * airless * air letter * airlift * airline * airliner * airlock * airmail * airman * Air Marshal * air mattress * air navigation * air out * airplane * air pocket * airport * air pressure * air pump * air purifier * air quotes * air raid * air rifle * airscrew * air-sea rescue * air shaft * airshed * airship * air show * airsick * airsickness * air sign * airspace * airspeed * airstrike * airstrip * airsuit * air support * airtaxi * air terminal * airtight * air time * air-to-air * air-to-ground * air-to-surface * air traffic control * air traffic controller * air vent * Air Vice Marshal * airwaves * airway * airwoman * airworthiness * airworthy * airy * alkaline air * breath of fresh air * build castles in the air * catch air * castle in the air * clear the air * dead air * dephlogisticated air * fire air * fixed air * fluoro acid air * fresh air * get some air / take some air * give oneself airs * hepatic air * hot air * inflammable air * in the air * into thin air * mid-air * mephitic air * nitrous air * on air * on the air * phlogisticated air * pure air * put on airs * too many balls in the air * up in the air * vital air * vitriolic acid air (air)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To bring (something) into contact with the air, so as to freshen or dry it.
  • To let fresh air into a room or a building, to ventilate.
  • It's getting quite stuffy in this room: let's open the windows and air it.
  • To discuss varying viewpoints on a given topic.
  • * 1917 , National Geographic , :
  • Thus, in spite of all opposition, the rural and urban assemblies retained the germ of local government, and in spite of the dual control, as the result of which much of their influence was nullified, they did have a certain value in airing abuses and suggesting improvements.
  • To broadcast, as with a television show.
  • Statistics

    *

    faired

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (fair)
  • Anagrams

    *

    fair

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) fayr, feir, fager, from (etyl) .

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Beautiful, of a pleasing appearance, with a pure and fresh quality.
  • :
  • :
  • *{{quote-book, year=1917, year_published=2008
  • , edition=HTML, author=(Edgar Rice Burroughs), publisher=The Gutenberg Project , title= A Princess of Mars , passage="It was a purely scientific research party sent out by my father's father, the Jeddak of Helium, to rechart the air currents, and to take atmospheric density tests," replied the fair prisoner, in a low, well-modulated voice.}}
  • *{{quote-book, year=2010, author=(Stephan Grundy)
  • , title= Beowulf , genre=Fiction, publisher=iUniverse, isbn=9781440156977, page=33 , passage=And yet he was also, though many generations separated them, distant cousin to the shining eoten-main Geard, whom the god Frea Ing had seen from afar and wedded; and to Scatha, the fair daughter of the old thurse Theasa, who had claimed a husband from among the gods as weregild for her father's slaying: often, it was said, the ugliest eotens would sire the fairest maids.}}
  • Unblemished (figuratively or literally); clean and pure; innocent.
  • :
  • :
  • *Book of Common Prayer
  • *:a fair white linen cloth
  • Light in color, pale, particularly as regards skin tone but also referring to blond hair.
  • :
  • *1677 , (Matthew Hale), The Primitive Origination of Mankind, Considered and Examined According to the Light of Nature , page 200
  • *:the northern people large and fair -complexioned
  • *
  • *:This new-comer was a man who in any company would have seemed striking. In complexion fair , and with blue or gray eyes, he was tall as any Viking, as broad in the shoulder.
  • Just, equitable.
  • :
  • *
  • *:“[…] it is not fair of you to bring against mankind double weapons ! Dangerous enough you are as woman alone, without bringing to your aid those gifts of mind suited to problems which men have been accustomed to arrogate to themselves.”
  • Adequate, reasonable, or decent.
  • :
  • *, chapter=3
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients , passage=My hopes wa'n't disappointed. I never saw clams thicker than they was along them inshore flats. I filled my dreener in no time, and then it come to me that 'twouldn't be a bad idee to get a lot more, take 'em with me to Wellmouth, and peddle 'em out. Clams was fairly scarce over that side of the bay and ought to fetch a fair price.}}
  • Favorable to a ship's course.
  • Not overcast; cloudless; clear; pleasant; propitious; said of the sky, weather, or wind, etc.
  • :
  • *(Matthew Prior) (1664-1721)
  • *:You wish fair winds may waft him over.
  • Free from obstacles or hindrances; unobstructed; unencumbered; open; direct; said of a road, passage, etc.
  • :
  • *Sir (Walter Raleigh) (ca.1554-1618)
  • *:The caliphs obtained a mighty empire, which was in a fair way to have enlarged.
  • (lb) Without sudden change of direction or curvature; smooth; flowing; said of the figure of a vessel, and of surfaces, water lines, and other lines.
  • (lb) Between the baselines.
  • Synonyms
    * (beautiful) beautiful, pretty, lovely * (unblemished) pure, clean, neat * (light in color) pale * (just) honest, just, equitable
    Derived terms
    * all's fair in love and war * fair and square * fair cop * fair copy * fair go * fair play * fair sex * fair to middling * fair use * fair-weather friend * to be fair

    Noun

    (fair)
  • Something which is fair (in various senses of the adjective).
  • When will we learn to distinguish between the fair and the foul?
  • (obsolete) A woman, a member of the ‘fair sex’; also as a collective singular, women.
  • * 1744 , , act 2, scene 8
  • ''Love and Hymen, hand in hand,
    ''Come, restore the nuptial band!
    ''And sincere delights prepare
    ''To crown the hero and the fair .
  • * 1749 , Henry Fielding, Tom Jones , Folio Society 1973, p. 39:
  • In enjoying, therefore, such place of rendezvous, the British fair ought to esteem themselves more happy than any of their foreign sisters
  • * 1819 , Lord Byron, Don Juan , III.24:
  • If single, probably his plighted Fair / Has in his absence wedded some rich miser [...].
  • (obsolete) Fairness, beauty.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • A fair woman; a sweetheart.
  • * Shenstone
  • I have found out a gift for my fair .
  • (obsolete) Good fortune; good luck.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Now fair befall thee!

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To smoothen or even a surface (especially a connection or junction on a surface).
  • To bring into perfect alignment (especially about rivet holes when connecting structural members).
  • To construct or design a structure whose primary function is to produce a smooth outline or reduce air drag or water resistance.
  • (obsolete) To make fair or beautiful.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Fairing the foul.
    Synonyms
    * (to reduce air drag or water resistance) to streamline
    Derived terms
    * fair off * fair up * fairing

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • Clearly; openly; frankly; civilly; honestly; favorably; auspiciously; agreeably.
  • Derived terms
    * bid fair * fair and square

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) feire, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A community gathering to celebrate and exhibit local achievements.
  • An event for public entertainment and trade, a market.
  • * , chapter=7
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=The turmoil went on—no rest, no peace. […] It was nearly eleven o'clock now, and he strolled out again. In the little fair created by the costers' barrows the evening only seemed beginning; and the naphtha flares made one's eyes ache, the men's voices grated harshly, and the girls' faces saddened one.}}
  • An event for professionals in a trade to learn of new products and do business.
  • A funfair, an amusement park.
  • Derived terms
    * funfair

    Statistics

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