Infant vs Faint - What's the difference?

infant | faint |


As nouns the difference between infant and faint

is that infant is a very young human being, from birth to somewhere between six months and two years of age, needing almost constant care and/or attention while faint is the act of fainting.

As verbs the difference between infant and faint

is that infant is (obsolete) to bear or bring forth (a child); to produce, in general while faint is to lose consciousness caused by a lack of oxygen or nutrients to the brain, usually as a result of a suddenly reduced blood flow (may be caused by emotional trauma, loss of blood or various medical conditions).

As an adjective faint is

lacking strength; weak; languid; inclined to swoon; as, faint with fatigue, hunger, or thirst.

infant

English

(wikipedia infant)

Alternative forms

* infaunt (obsolete)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A very young human being, from birth to somewhere between six months and two years of age, needing almost constant care and/or attention.
  • (legal) A minor.
  • (obsolete) A noble or aristocratic youth.
  • * 1590 , (Edmund Spenser), The Faerie Queene , III.2:
  • Retourned home, the royall Infant fell / Into her former fitt [...].

    See also

    * sudden infant death syndrome * newborn * neonate

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To bear or bring forth (a child); to produce, in general.
  • * Milton
  • This worthy motto, "No bishop, no king," is infanted out of the same fears.
    ----

    faint

    English

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Lacking strength; weak; languid; inclined to swoon; as, faint with fatigue, hunger, or thirst.
  • Wanting in courage, spirit, or energy; timorous; cowardly; dejected; depressed.
  • "Faint heart ne'er won fair lady." Robert Burns - To Dr. Blackjack.
  • Lacking distinctness; hardly perceptible; striking the senses feebly; not bright, or loud, or sharp, or forcible; weak; as, a faint color, or sound.
  • Performed, done, or acted, in a weak or feeble manner; not exhibiting vigor, strength, or energy; slight; as, faint efforts; faint resistance.
  • * Sir J. Davies
  • the faint prosecution of the war
  • * 2005 , .
  • do you have the faintest understanding of what they mean?

    Derived terms

    * damn with faint praise

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The act of fainting.
  • (rare) The state of one who has fainted; a swoon.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To lose consciousness. Caused by a lack of oxygen or nutrients to the brain, usually as a result of a suddenly reduced blood flow (may be caused by emotional trauma, loss of blood or various medical conditions).
  • * Bible, Mark viii. 8
  • If I send them away fasting they will faint by the way.
  • * Guardian
  • Hearing the honour intended her, she fainted away.
  • To sink into dejection; to lose courage or spirit; to become depressed or despondent.
  • * Bible, Proverbs xxiv. 10
  • If thou faint in the day of adversity, thy strength is small.
  • To decay; to disappear; to vanish.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • Gilded clouds, while we gaze upon them, faint before the eye.

    Synonyms

    * pass out * queal * swoon

    Anagrams

    * * ----