Wadest vs Fadest - What's the difference?

wadest | fadest |


As a verb wadest

is (archaic) (wade).

As an adjective fadest is

(fade).

wadest

English

Verb

(head)
  • (archaic) (wade)

  • wade

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) wadan'', from (etyl) "to go". Cognates include Latin ''vadere "go, walk; rush" (whence English invade, evade).

    Verb

    (wad)
  • to walk through water or something that impedes progress.
  • * Milton
  • So eagerly the fiend / With head, hands, wings, or feet, pursues his way, / And swims, or sinks, or wades , or creeps, or flies.
  • * 1918 , (Edgar Rice Burroughs), Chapter VIII
  • After breakfast the men set out to hunt, while the women went to a large pool of warm water covered with a green scum and filled with billions of tadpoles. They waded in to where the water was about a foot deep and lay down in the mud. They remained there from one to two hours and then returned to the cliff.
  • to progress with difficulty
  • to wade through a dull book
  • * Dryden
  • And wades through fumes, and gropes his way.
  • * Davenant
  • The king's admirable conduct has waded through all these difficulties.
  • to walk through (water or similar impediment); to pass through by wading
  • wading swamps and rivers
  • To enter recklessly.
  • to wade into a fight or a debate

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • an act of wading
  • Etymology 2

    Noun

    (-)
  • (Mortimer)
    (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

    * * ----

    fadest

    English

    Adjective

    (head)
  • (fade)
  • Anagrams

    *

    fade

    English

    (wikipedia fade)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) fade, fede, of uncertain origin. Compare (etyl) . See also (l).

    Adjective

    (en-adj)
  • (archaic) Strong; bold; doughty
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) fade, vad, .

    Adjective

    (er)
  • (archaic) Weak; insipid; tasteless; commonplace.
  • * Jeffery
  • Passages that are somewhat fade .
  • * De Quincey
  • His masculine taste gave him a sense of something fade and ludicrous.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (golf) A golf shot that (for the right-handed player) curves intentionally to the right. See slice, hook, draw.
  • A haircut where the hair is short or shaved on the sides of the head and longer on top. See also high-top fade and low fade.
  • (slang) A fight
  • Verb

    (fad)
  • To become faded; to grow weak; to lose strength; to decay; to perish gradually; to wither, as a plant.
  • * Bible, Is. xxiv. 4
  • The earth mourneth and fadeth away.
  • To lose freshness, color, or brightness; to become faint in hue or tint; hence, to be wanting in color.
  • * Milton
  • flowers that never fade
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham)
  • , title=(The China Governess) , chapter=1 citation , passage=The half-dozen pieces […] were painted white and carved with festoons of flowers, birds and cupids. To display them the walls had been tinted a vivid blue which had now faded , but the carpet, which had evidently been stored and recently relaid, retained its original turquoise.}}
  • To sink away; to disappear gradually; to grow dim; to vanish.
  • The milkman's whistling faded into the distance.
  • * Addison
  • The stars shall fade away.
  • * Shakespeare
  • He makes a swanlike end, / Fading in music.
  • * 1856 : (Gustave Flaubert), (Madame Bovary), Part III Chapter XI, translated by Eleanor Marx-Aveling
  • A strange thing was that Bovary, while continually thinking of Emma, was forgetting her. He grew desperate as he felt this image fading from his memory in spite of all efforts to retain it. Yet every night he dreamt of her; it was always the same dream. He drew near her, but when he was about to clasp her she fell into decay in his arms.
  • To cause to fade.
  • Synonyms
    * decrease, wane, become smaller (sort out synonyms by senses)

    Anagrams

    * * ----