Fakest vs Fadest - What's the difference?

fakest | fadest |


As adjectives the difference between fakest and fadest

is that fakest is (fake) while fadest is (fade).

fakest

English

Adjective

(head)
  • (fake)

  • fake

    English

    Etymology 1

    (wikipedia fake) The origin is not known with certainty, although first attested in 1775

    Adjective

    (en-adj)
  • Not real; false, fraudulent.
  • Which fur coat looks fake ?
    Synonyms
    * See also
    Antonyms
    * genuine

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Something which is not genuine, or is presented fraudulently.
  • A trick; a swindle.
  • (soccer) Move meant to deceive an opposing player, used for gaining advantage when dribbling an opponent.
  • Synonyms
    * (soccer move) feint, (ice hokey move) deke

    Verb

    (fak)
  • To cheat; to swindle; to steal; to rob.
  • To make; to construct; to do. (rfexample)
  • To modify fraudulently, so as to make an object appear better or other than it really is; as, to fake a bulldog, by burning his upper lip and thus artificially shortening it.
  • To make a counterfeit, to counterfeit, to forge, to falsify.
  • To make a false display of, to affect, to feign, to simulate.
  • Synonyms
    * (To modify fraudulently) adulterate * (To make a false display) pass off, pose
    Derived terms
    * fake out * faker

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) (m), to coil a rope .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (nautical) One of the circles or windings of a cable or hawser, as it lies in a coil; a single turn or coil.
  • Verb

    (fak)
  • (nautical) To coil (a rope, line, or hawser), by winding alternately in opposite directions, in layers usually of zigzag or figure of eight form, to prevent twisting when running out.
  • fadest

    English

    Adjective

    (head)
  • (fade)
  • Anagrams

    *

    fade

    English

    (wikipedia fade)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) fade, fede, of uncertain origin. Compare (etyl) . See also (l).

    Adjective

    (en-adj)
  • (archaic) Strong; bold; doughty
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) fade, vad, .

    Adjective

    (er)
  • (archaic) Weak; insipid; tasteless; commonplace.
  • * Jeffery
  • Passages that are somewhat fade .
  • * De Quincey
  • His masculine taste gave him a sense of something fade and ludicrous.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (golf) A golf shot that (for the right-handed player) curves intentionally to the right. See slice, hook, draw.
  • A haircut where the hair is short or shaved on the sides of the head and longer on top. See also high-top fade and low fade.
  • (slang) A fight
  • Verb

    (fad)
  • To become faded; to grow weak; to lose strength; to decay; to perish gradually; to wither, as a plant.
  • * Bible, Is. xxiv. 4
  • The earth mourneth and fadeth away.
  • To lose freshness, color, or brightness; to become faint in hue or tint; hence, to be wanting in color.
  • * Milton
  • flowers that never fade
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham)
  • , title=(The China Governess) , chapter=1 citation , passage=The half-dozen pieces […] were painted white and carved with festoons of flowers, birds and cupids. To display them the walls had been tinted a vivid blue which had now faded , but the carpet, which had evidently been stored and recently relaid, retained its original turquoise.}}
  • To sink away; to disappear gradually; to grow dim; to vanish.
  • The milkman's whistling faded into the distance.
  • * Addison
  • The stars shall fade away.
  • * Shakespeare
  • He makes a swanlike end, / Fading in music.
  • * 1856 : (Gustave Flaubert), (Madame Bovary), Part III Chapter XI, translated by Eleanor Marx-Aveling
  • A strange thing was that Bovary, while continually thinking of Emma, was forgetting her. He grew desperate as he felt this image fading from his memory in spite of all efforts to retain it. Yet every night he dreamt of her; it was always the same dream. He drew near her, but when he was about to clasp her she fell into decay in his arms.
  • To cause to fade.
  • Synonyms
    * decrease, wane, become smaller (sort out synonyms by senses)

    Anagrams

    * * ----