Rational vs Faculty - What's the difference?

rational | faculty |


As nouns the difference between rational and faculty

is that rational is (mathematics) a rational number: a number that can be expressed as the quotient of two integers while faculty is the scholarly staff at colleges or universities, as opposed to the students or support staff.

As an adjective rational

is capable of reasoning.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

rational

English

Alternative forms

* rationall (obsolete)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) rationel, rational, from (etyl)

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • Capable of reasoning.
  • *
  • Logically sound; not contradictory or otherwise absurd.
  • (label) Healthy or balanced intellectually; exhibiting reasonableness.
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2014-06-21, volume=411, issue=8892, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Magician’s brain , passage=The [Isaac] Newton that emerges from the [unpublished] manuscripts is far from the popular image of a rational practitioner of cold and pure reason. The architect of modern science was himself not very modern. He was obsessed with alchemy.}}
  • Of a number, capable of being expressed as the ratio of two integers.
  • ¾ is a rational number, but ?2 is an irrational number.
  • Of an algebraic expression, capable of being expressed as the ratio of two polynomials.
  • (label) Expressing the type, structure, relations, and reactions of a compound; graphic; said of formulae.
  • Antonyms
    * (reasonable) absurd, irrational, nonsensical * (capable of reasoning) arational, irrational, non-rational * (number theory) irrational

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) rational, from , for which see the first etymology.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (mathematics) A rational number: a number that can be expressed as the quotient of two integers.
  • The quotient of two rationals''' is again a '''rational .
  • A rational being.
  • (Young)

    References

    * *

    Anagrams

    *

    faculty

    English

    Noun

    (faculties)
  • The scholarly staff at colleges or universities, as opposed to the students or support staff.
  • A division of a university (e.g. a Faculty of Science or Faculty of Medicine).
  • An ability, skill, or power, often plural.
  • * '>citation
  • I have used the notion of games so far as if it were familiar to most people. I think this is justified as everyone knows how to play some games. Accordingly, games serve admirably as models for the clarification of other, less well-understood, social-psychological phenomena. Yet the ability to follow rules, play games, and construct new games is a faculty not equally shared by all persons. [...]
    He lived until he reached the age of 90 with most of his faculties intact.

    Synonyms

    * See also