What's the difference between
and
Enter two words to compare and contrast their definitions, origins, and synonyms to better understand how those words are related.

Entertain vs Experience - What's the difference?

entertain | experience |

As nouns the difference between entertain and experience

is that entertain is (obsolete) ; pleasure while experience is experiment, trial, test.

As a verb entertain

is to amuse (someone); to engage the attention of agreeably.

entertain

English

Verb

(en verb)
  • To amuse (someone); to engage the attention of agreeably.
  • to entertain friends with lively conversation
    The motivational speaker not only instructed but also entertained the audience.
  • (transitive, and, intransitive) To have someone over at one's home for a party or visit.
  • They enjoy entertaining a lot.
  • * Bible, Heb. xiii. 2
  • Be not forgetful to entertain strangers
  • To receive and take into consideration; to have a thought in mind.
  • The committee would like to entertain the idea of reducing the budget figures.
    to entertain a proposal
  • * De Quincey
  • I am not here going to entertain so large a theme as the philosophy of Locke.
  • * Hawthorne
  • A rumour gained ground, — and, however absurd, was entertained by some very sensible people.
  • (obsolete) To take or keep in one's service; to maintain; to support; to harbour; to keep.
  • * Shakespeare
  • You, sir, I entertain for one of my hundred.
  • (obsolete) To meet or encounter, as an enemy.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • (obsolete) To lead on; to bring along; to introduce.
  • * Jeremy Taylor
  • to baptize all nations, and entertain them into the services and institutions of the holy Jesus

    Derived terms

    * entertainer * entertaining * entertainment

    Noun

    (-)
  • (obsolete) ; pleasure.
  • (obsolete) Reception of a guest; welcome.
  • * 1596 , (Edmund Spenser), The Faerie Queene , IV.8:
  • But neede, that answers not to all requests, / Bad them not looke for better entertayne […].

    Anagrams

    *

    experience

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Event(s) of which one is cognizant.
  • (label) An activity which one has performed.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1913, author=
  • , title=Lord Stranleigh Abroad , chapter=4 citation , passage=“I have tried, as I hinted, to enlist the co-operation of other capitalists, but experience has taught me that any appeal is futile that does not impinge directly upon cupidity. …”}}
  • (label) A collection of events and/or activities from which an individual or group may gather knowledge, opinions, and skills.
  • (label) The knowledge thus gathered.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-07, author= Ed Pilkington
  • , volume=188, issue=26, page=6, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= ‘Killer robots’ should be banned in advance, UN told , passage=In his submission to the UN, [Christof] Heyns points to the experience of drones. Unmanned aerial vehicles were intended initially only for surveillance, and their use for offensive purposes was prohibited, yet once strategists realised their perceived advantages as a means of carrying out targeted killings, all objections were swept out of the way.}}

    Usage notes

    * Adjectives often applied to "experience": broad, wide, good, bad, great, amazing, horrible, terrible, pleasant, unpleasant, educational, financial, military, commercial, academic, political, industrial, sexual, romantic, religious, mystical, spiritual, psychedelic, scientific, human, magical, intense, deep, humbling, unforgettable, unique, exciting, exhilarating.

    Antonyms

    * inexperience

    Derived terms

    * experiential * experience points * experienced

    Verb

    (experienc)
  • To observe certain events; undergo a certain feeling or process; or perform certain actions that may alter one or contribute to one's knowledge, opinions, or skills.
  • Derived terms

    * experienceable