Miniature vs Exiguous - What's the difference?

miniature | exiguous | Related terms |

Miniature is a related term of exiguous.


As adjectives the difference between miniature and exiguous

is that miniature is smaller than normal while exiguous is scanty; meager.

As a noun miniature

is greatly diminished size or form; reduced scale.

As a verb miniature

is to make smaller than normal; to reproduce in miniature.

miniature

Noun

(en noun)
  • Greatly diminished size or form; reduced scale.
  • A small version of something; a model of reduced scale.
  • There was a miniature of a whaling ship in a glass bottle over the mantlepiece.
  • A small, highly detailed painting, a portrait miniature.
  • The art of painting such highly detailed miniature works.
  • An illustration in an illuminated manuscript.
  • A musical composition which is short in duration.
  • Sacha composed a miniature for strings as a final project at the conservatory.
  • (gaming) A token in a game representing a unit or character.
  • Jack had dozens of miniatures of Napoleonic footsoldiers painted in detailed period regalia for his wargames.
  • Lettering in red; rubric distinction.
  • A particular feature or trait.
  • (Massinger)

    Derived terms

    * miniaturist

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Smaller than normal.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-09-06, author= Alok Jha
  • , volume=189, issue=13, page=39, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Miniature brains grown in lab , passage=Scientists have grown miniature human brains in test tubes, creating a "tool" that will allow them to watch how the organs develop in the womb and, they hope, increase their understanding of neurological and mental problems. ¶ Just a few millimetres across, the "cerebral organoids" are built up of layers of brain cells with defined regions that resemble those seen in immature, embryonic brains.}}

    Derived terms

    * miniature poodle * miniaturism

    Verb

    (miniatur)
  • To make smaller than normal; to reproduce in miniature.
  • ----

    exiguous

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • scanty; meager
  • * 1889 — ch XIII
  • The herdboy in the broom, already musical in the days of Father Chaucer, startles (and perhaps pains) the lark with this exiguous pipe.
  • * 1912 — ch VII
  • The path on which I then planted my feet was quite unprecedentedly narrow. I had never had to walk along a thoroughfare so exiguous .
  • * 1998 — Michael Ignatieff, Rebirth of a Nation: An Anatomy of Russia . New Statesman, Feb 6.
  • They are entering the market, setting up stalls on snowy streets, moonlighting to supplement exiguous incomes.
  • * 2001 — Terence Brown, The Life of W. B. Yeats: A Critical Biography .
  • Among the pressures provoking these distresses were a father's financial inadequacy and a growing awareness that, by finding employment himself, he could ameliorate the family's exiguous circumstances.
  • * 2012 — Rodger Cohen, Scottexalonia Rising, New York Times, Nov. 26., Op. Ed.
  • National politics, as President François Hollande of France is only the latest to discover, is often no more than tweaking at the margins in the exiguous political space left by markets and other global forces.

    Derived terms

    * exiguity * exiguously * exiguousness