Dance vs Exercise - What's the difference?

dance | exercise |


As verbs the difference between dance and exercise

is that dance is while exercise is to exert for the sake of training or improvement; to practice in order to develop.

As a noun exercise is

any activity designed to develop or hone a skill or ability.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

dance

English

Alternative forms

* daunce (obsolete)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A sequence of rhythmic steps or movements usually performed to music, for pleasure or as a form of social interaction.
  • *
  • *:"I ought to arise and go forth with timbrels and with dances ; but, do you know, I am not inclined to revels? There has been a little—just a very little bit too much festivity so far …. Not that I don't adore dinners and gossip and dances; not that I do not love to pervade bright and glittering places."
  • A social gathering where dancing is the main activity.
  • *
  • *:"I ought to arise and go forth with timbrels and with dances; but, do you know, I am not inclined to revels? There has been a little—just a very little bit too much festivity so far …. Not that I don't adore dinners and gossip and dances ; not that I do not love to pervade bright and glittering places."
  • (lb) A fess that has been modified to zig-zag across the center of a coat of arms from dexter to sinister.
  • A genre of modern music characterised by sampled beats, repetitive rhythms and few lyrics.
  • (lb) The art, profession, and study of dancing.
  • A piece of music with a particular dance rhythm.
  • *
  • *:They stayed together during three dances , went out on to the terrace, explored wherever they were permitted to explore, paid two visits to the buffet, and enjoyed themselves much in the same way as if they had been school-children surreptitiously breaking loose from an assembly of grown-ups.
  • Hyponyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * dance music * dirty dance * fan dance * line dance * * war dance

    Verb

    (danc)
  • To move with rhythmic steps or movements, especially in time to music.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=4 , passage=“Well,” I answered, at first with uncertainty, then with inspiration, “he would do splendidly to lead your cotillon, if you think of having one.” ¶ “So you do not dance , Mr. Crocker?” ¶ I was somewhat set back by her perspicuity.}}
  • To leap or move lightly and rapidly.
  • * Byron
  • Shadows in the glassy waters dance .
  • To perform the steps to.
  • To cause to dance, or move nimbly or merrily about.
  • * (William Shakespeare)
  • to dance our ringlets to the whistling wind
  • * (William Shakespeare)
  • Thy grandsire loved thee well; / Many a time he danced thee on his knee.

    Derived terms

    * dance attendance * dancer * dirty dance * line dance

    See also

    * * acrobatics * ballet * ballroom * disco * foxtrot * hiphop * jazz * modern * musical theatre * tap dancing * terpsichorean

    Anagrams

    *

    References

    1000 English basic words ----

    exercise

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Any activity designed to develop or hone a skill or ability.
  • :
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:desire of knightly exercise
  • *(John Locke) (1632-1705)
  • *:an exercise of the eyes and memory
  • Physical activity intended to improve strength and fitness.
  • *
  • *:This new-comer was a man who in any company would have seemed striking.He was smooth-faced, and his fresh skin and well-developed figure bespoke the man in good physical condition through active exercise , yet well content with the world's apportionment.
  • A setting in action or practicing; employment in the proper mode of activity; exertion; application; use.
  • *(Thomas Jefferson) (1743-1826)
  • *:exercise of the important function confided by the constitution to the legislature
  • * (1809-1892)
  • *:O we will walk this world, / Yoked in all exercise of noble end.
  • The performance of an office, ceremony, or duty.
  • *(Joseph Addison) (1672-1719)
  • *:Lewis refused even those of the church of Englandthe public exercise of their religion.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:to draw him from his holy exercise
  • (lb) That which gives practice; a trial; a test.
  • *(John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • *:Patience is more oft the exercise / Of saints, the trial of their fortitude.
  • Alternative forms

    * exercice * excercise

    Derived terms

    * exercise book * exercise machine * five-finger exercise * floor exercise * military exercise

    Verb

    (exercis)
  • To exert for the sake of training or improvement; to practice in order to develop.
  • :
  • To perform physical activity for health or training.
  • :
  • To use (a right, an option, etc.); to put into practice.
  • :
  • :
  • *Bible, (w) xxii. 29
  • *:The people of the land have used oppression and exercised robbery.
  • To occupy the attention and effort of; to task; to tax, especially in a painful or vexatious manner; harass; to vex; to worry or make anxious.
  • :
  • *(and other bibliographic particulars for citation) (John Milton)
  • *:Where pain of unextinguishable fire / Must exercise us without hope of end.
  • (lb) To set in action; to cause to act, move, or make exertion; to give employment to.
  • *Bible, (w) xxiv. 16
  • *:Herein do I exercise myself, to have always a conscience void of offence.
  • *
  • *:Little disappointed, then, she turned attention to "Chat of the Social World," gossip which exercised potent fascination upon the girl's intelligence.