Discriminating vs Exclusive - What's the difference?

discriminating | exclusive |


As adjectives the difference between discriminating and exclusive

is that discriminating is able to perceive fine distinctions between similar things; perceptive while exclusive is (literally) excluding items or members that do not meet certain conditions.

As a verb discriminating

is .

As a noun exclusive is

information (or an artefact) that is granted or obtained exclusively.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

discriminating

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • Able to perceive fine distinctions between similar things; perceptive
  • Having a discerning judgment or taste
  • Verb

    (head)
  • exclusive

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (literally) Excluding items or members that do not meet certain conditions.
  • (figuratively) Referring to a membership organisation, service or product: of high quality and/or reknown, for superior members only. A snobbish usage, suggesting that members who do not meet requirements, which may be financial, of celebrity, religion, skin colour etc., are excluded.
  • Exclusive''' clubs tend to serve ' exclusive brands of food and drinks, in the same exorbitant price range, such as the 'finest' French châteaux.
  • exclusionary
  • whole, undivided, entire
  • ''The teacher's pet commands the teacher's exclusive attention.

    Antonyms

    * inclusive * non-exclusive

    Derived terms

    * exclusively * exclusiveness * exclusive or * exclusive right * exclusivity * mutually exclusive

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Information (or an artefact) that is granted or obtained exclusively.
  • ''The editor agreed to keep a lid on a potentially distastrous political scoop in exchange for an exclusive of a happier nature
  • (grammar) A word or phrase that restricts something, such as only'', ''solely'', or ''simply .