Roar vs Exclamation - What's the difference?

roar | exclamation | Related terms |

Roar is a related term of exclamation.


As a proper noun roar

is .

As a noun exclamation is

a loud calling or crying out; outcry; loud or emphatic utterance; vehement vociferation; clamor; that which is cried out, as an expression of feeling; sudden expression of sound or words indicative of emotion, as in surprise, pain, grief, joy, anger, etc.

roar

English

Verb

(en verb)
  • To make a loud, deep cry, especially from pain, anger, or other strong emotion.
  • * Dryden
  • Sole on the barren sands, the suffering chief / Roared out for anguish, and indulged his grief.
  • To laugh in a particularly loud manner.
  • The audience roared at his jokes.
  • Of animals (especially the lion), to make a loud deep noise.
  • * Spenser
  • Roaring bulls he would him make to tame.
  • Generally, of inanimate objects etc., to make a loud resounding noise.
  • * Milton
  • The brazen throat of war had ceased to roar .
  • * Gray
  • How oft I crossed where carts and coaches roar .
  • (figuratively) To proceed vigorously.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=January 25, author=Phil McNulty, work=BBC
  • , title= Blackpool 2-3 Man Utd , passage=United's attempt to extend their unbeaten league sequence to 23 games this season looked to be in shreds as the Seasiders - managed by Ian Holloway - roared into a fully deserved two-goal lead at the interval. }}
  • To cry aloud; to proclaim loudly.
  • * Ford
  • This last action will roar thy infamy.
  • * , chapter=7
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients , passage=I made a speaking trumpet of my hands and commenced to whoop “Ahoy!” and “Hello!” at the top of my lungs. […] The Colonel woke up, and, after asking what in brimstone was the matter, opened his mouth and roared “Hi!” and “Hello!” like the bull of Bashan.}}
  • To be boisterous; to be disorderly.
  • * Bishop Burnet
  • It was a mad, roaring time, full of extravagance.
  • To make a loud noise in breathing, as horses do when they have a certain disease.
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • A long, loud, deep shout made with the mouth wide open.
  • The cry of the lion.
  • * 1900 , , (The Wonderful Wizard of Oz)
  • The Winkies were not a brave people, but they had to do as they were told. So they marched away until they came near to Dorothy. Then the Lion gave a great roar and sprang towards them, and the poor Winkies were so frightened that they ran back as fast as they could.
  • The deep cry of the bull.
  • A loud resounding noise.
  • the roar of a motorbike
  • * 1944, , Brave Men , University of Nebraska Press (2001), page 107:
  • "Those lovely valleys and mountains were filled throughout the day and night with the roar of heavy shooting."
  • A show of strength or character.
  • exclamation

    English

    (Webster 1913)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A loud calling or crying out; outcry; loud or emphatic utterance; vehement vociferation; clamor; that which is cried out, as an expression of feeling; sudden expression of sound or words indicative of emotion, as in surprise, pain, grief, joy, anger, etc.
  • A word expressing outcry; an interjection; a word expressing passion, as wonder, fear, or grief.
  • A mark or sign by which outcry or emphatic utterance is marked; thus [!]; – also called an exclamation point.
  • Derived terms

    * exclamation mark * exclamation point

    Anagrams

    * ----