Assurance vs Evidence - What's the difference?

assurance | evidence |


As nouns the difference between assurance and evidence

is that assurance is the act of assuring; a declaration tending to inspire full confidence; that which is designed to give confidence while evidence is obviousness, clearness.

assurance

English

Alternative forms

* assuraunce

Noun

(en noun)
  • The act of assuring; a declaration tending to inspire full confidence; that which is designed to give confidence.
  • *(w) xvii. 31.
  • *:Whereof he hath given assurance unto all men, in that he hath raised him from the dead.
  • * (1800-1859)
  • *:Assurances of support came pouring in daily.
  • The state of being assured; firm persuasion; full confidence or trust; freedom from doubt; certainty.
  • *(w) x. 22.
  • *:Let us draw with a true heart in full assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled from an evil conscience.
  • Firmness of mind; undoubting, steadiness; intrepidity; courage; confidence; self-reliance.
  • *(Richard Knolles) (1545-1610)
  • *:Brave men meet danger with assurance .
  • *(John Locke) (1632-1705)
  • *:Conversation with the world will give them knowledge and assurance .
  • *
  • *:This new-comer was a man who in any company would have seemed striking.His air, of self-confident assurance , seemed that of a man well used to having his own way.
  • Excess of boldness; impudence; audacity; as, his assurance is intolerable.
  • (lb) Betrothal; affiance.
  • Insurance; a contract for the payment of a sum on occasion of a certain event, as loss or death. &hand; Recently, assurance has been used, in England, in relation to life contingencies, and insurance in relation to other contingencies. It is called temporary assurance, in the time within which the contingent event must happen is limited.
  • (lb) Any written or other legal evidence of the conveyance of property; a conveyance; a deed. &hand; In England, the legal evidences of the conveyance of property are called the common assurances of the kingdom. ((William Blackstone) (1723-1780))
  • References

    *

    Anagrams

    * ----

    evidence

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • Facts or observations presented in support of an assertion.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=1 , passage=In the old days, to my commonplace and unobserving mind, he gave no evidences of genius whatsoever. He never read me any of his manuscripts, […], and therefore my lack of detection of his promise may in some degree be pardoned.}}
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2012-03, author=
  • , volume=100, issue=2, page=106, magazine=(w) , title= Pixels or Perish , passage=Drawings and pictures are more than mere ornaments in scientific discourse. Blackboard sketches, geological maps, diagrams of molecular structure, astronomical photographs, MRI images, the many varieties of statistical charts and graphs: These pictorial devices are indispensable tools for presenting evidence , for explaining a theory, for telling a story.}}
  • (legal) Anything admitted by a court to prove or disprove alleged matters of fact in a trial.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2004, date=April 15, work=The Scotsman
  • , title= Morning swoop in hunt for Jodi's killer , passage=For Lothian and Borders Police, the early-morning raid had come at the end one of biggest investigations carried out by the force, which had originally presented a dossier of evidence on the murder of Jodi Jones to the Edinburgh procurator-fiscal, William Gallagher, on 25 November last year. }}
  • One who bears witness.
  • * Sir (Walter Scott)
  • infamous and perjured evidences

    Derived terms

    * anecdotal evidence * circumstantial evidence * evidence-based medicine * hearsay evidence

    Derived terms

    * after-discovered evidence * clear and convincing evidence * demurrer to evidence * preponderance of evidence, preponderance of the evidence * self-evidence

    Verb

    (evidenc)
  • To provide evidence for, or suggest the truth of.
  • She was furious, as evidenced by her slamming the door.