Term vs Epoch - What's the difference?

term | epoch |


As nouns the difference between term and epoch

is that term is term while epoch is a particular period of history, especially one considered remarkable or noteworthy.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

term

English

(wikipedia term)

Noun

(en noun)
  • Limitation, restriction or regulation. (rfex)
  • Any of the binding conditions or promises in a legal contract.
  • That which limits the extent of anything; limit; extremity; bound; boundary.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • Corruption is a reciprocal to generation, and they two are as nature's two terms , or boundaries.
  • (geometry) A point, line, or superficies that limits.
  • A line is the term''' of a superficies, and a superficies is the '''term of a solid.
  • A word or phrase, especially one from a specialised area of knowledge.
  • "Algorithm" is a term used in computer science.
  • Relations among people.
  • * , chapter=22
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Not unnaturally, “Auntie” took this communication in bad part.
  • Part of a year, especially one of the three parts of an academic year.
  • (mathematics) Any value (variable or constant) or expression separated from another term by a space or an appropriate character, in an overall expression or┬átable.
  • (logic) The subject or the predicate of a proposition; one of the three component parts of a syllogism, each one of which is used twice.
  • * Sir W. Hamilton
  • The subject and predicate of a proposition are, after Aristotle, together called its terms or extremes.
  • (architecture) A quadrangular pillar, adorned on top with the figure of a head, as of a man, woman, or satyr.
  • Duration of a set length; period in office of fixed length.
  • (computing) A terminal emulator, a program that emulates a video terminal.
  • (of a patent) The maximum period during which the patent can be maintained into force.
  • (astrology) An essential dignity in which unequal segments of every astrological sign have internal rulerships which affect the power and integrity of each planet in a natal chart.
  • (archaic) A menstrual period.
  • * 1660 , (Samuel Pepys), Diary
  • My wife, after the absence of her terms for seven weeks, gave me hopes of her being with child, but on the last day of the year she hath them again.
  • (nautical) A piece of carved work placed under each end of the taffrail.
  • Derived terms

    {{der3, at term , blanket term , collective term , come to terms , long-term , midterm , short-term , term limit , term logic , term of art , terms and conditions , umbrella term}}

    See also

    * idiom * lexeme * listeme * word

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To phrase a certain way, especially with an unusual wording.
  • *
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=September-October, author=(Henry Petroski)
  • , magazine=(American Scientist), title= The Evolution of Eyeglasses , passage=The ability of a segment of a glass sphere to magnify whatever is placed before it was known around the year 1000, when the spherical segment was called a reading stone, essentially what today we might term a frameless magnifying glass or plain glass paperweight.}}

    epoch

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A particular period of history, especially one considered remarkable or noteworthy.
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2012-01
  • , author=Donald Worster , title=A Drier and Hotter Future , volume=100, issue=1, page=70 , magazine= citation , passage=Phoenix and Lubbock are both caught in severe drought, and it is going to get much worse. We may see many such [dust] storms in the decades ahead, along with species extinctions, radical disturbance of ecosystems, and intensified social conflict over land and water. Welcome to the Anthropocene, the epoch when humans have become a major geological and climatic force.}}
  • A notable event which marks the beginning of such a period.
  • (astronomy) A precise instant of time that is used as a reference point.
  • (computing, uncountable) A precise instant of time that is used as a reference point (e.g. January 1, 1970, 00:00:00 UTC).
  • Synonyms

    * a particular period in history: era; age (epoch is a subcategory of era and/or age)

    Anagrams

    *