Banquet vs Entertain - What's the difference?

banquet | entertain |


In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between banquet and entertain

is that banquet is (obsolete) to have dessert after a feast while entertain is (obsolete) reception of a guest; welcome.

As nouns the difference between banquet and entertain

is that banquet is a large celebratory meal; a feast while entertain is (obsolete) ; pleasure.

As verbs the difference between banquet and entertain

is that banquet is to participate in a banquet; to feast while entertain is to amuse (someone); to engage the attention of agreeably.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

banquet

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A large celebratory meal; a feast.
  • (archaic) A dessert; a course of sweetmeats.
  • * Massinger
  • We'll dine in the great room, but let the music / And banquet be prepared here.

    Verb

  • To participate in a banquet; to feast.
  • * Milton
  • Were it a draught for Juno when she banquets , I would not taste thy treasonous offer.
  • (obsolete) To have dessert after a feast.
  • * Cavendish
  • Where they did both sup and banquet .
  • To treat with a banquet or sumptuous entertainment of food; to feast.
  • * Coleridge
  • Just in time to banquet / The illustrious company assembled there.
    ----

    entertain

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To amuse (someone); to engage the attention of agreeably.
  • to entertain friends with lively conversation
    The motivational speaker not only instructed but also entertained the audience.
  • (transitive, and, intransitive) To have someone over at one's home for a party or visit.
  • They enjoy entertaining a lot.
  • * Bible, Heb. xiii. 2
  • Be not forgetful to entertain strangers
  • To receive and take into consideration; to have a thought in mind.
  • The committee would like to entertain the idea of reducing the budget figures.
    to entertain a proposal
  • * De Quincey
  • I am not here going to entertain so large a theme as the philosophy of Locke.
  • * Hawthorne
  • A rumour gained ground, — and, however absurd, was entertained by some very sensible people.
  • (obsolete) To take or keep in one's service; to maintain; to support; to harbour; to keep.
  • * Shakespeare
  • You, sir, I entertain for one of my hundred.
  • (obsolete) To meet or encounter, as an enemy.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • (obsolete) To lead on; to bring along; to introduce.
  • * Jeremy Taylor
  • to baptize all nations, and entertain them into the services and institutions of the holy Jesus

    Derived terms

    * entertainer * entertaining * entertainment

    Noun

    (-)
  • (obsolete) ; pleasure.
  • (obsolete) Reception of a guest; welcome.
  • * 1596 , (Edmund Spenser), The Faerie Queene , IV.8:
  • But neede, that answers not to all requests, / Bad them not looke for better entertayne […].

    Anagrams

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