What is the difference between endemic and aboriginal?

endemic | aboriginal | Synonyms |

Endemic is a synonym of aboriginal.


As adjectives the difference between endemic and aboriginal

is that endemic is native to a particular area or culture; originating where it occurs while aboriginal is first according to historical or scientific records; original; indigenous; primitive {{defdate|first attested in the mid 17th century}}{{reference-book|last =|first =|authorlink =|coauthors =|editor =brown, lesley|others =|title = the shorter oxford english dictionary|origdate =|origyear = 1933|origmonth =|url =|format =|accessdate =|accessyear =|accessmonth =|edition = 5th|date =|year =2003|month =|publisher =oxford university press|location =oxford, uk|language =|id =|doi =|isbn =978-0-19-860575-7|lccn =|ol =|pages =6|chapter =|chapterurl =|quote =}}.

As nouns the difference between endemic and aboriginal

is that endemic is an individual or species that is endemic to a region while aboriginal is an animal or plant native to a region {{defdate|first attested in the mid 18th century}}.

endemic

English

Alternative forms

* endemick (obsolete)

Adjective

(Wikipedia) (-)
  • Native to a particular area or culture; originating where it occurs.
  • Kangaroos are endemic to Australia.
  • (Especially of plants and animals.) Peculiar to a particular area or region; not found in other places.
  • The endemic religion of Easter Island arrived with the Polynesian settlers.
  • (Especially of diseases.) Prevalent in a particular area or region.
  • Malaria is endemic to the tropics.
  • * 1998 , Gillian Catriona Ramchand, Deconstructing the Lexicon , in Miriam Butt and Wilhelm Geuder, eds. “The Projection of Arguments”
  • These problems are endemic to the theory of thematic roles as currently conceived, because the classification it implies simply does not correspond to legitimate linguistic semantic definitions.

    Usage notes

    An endemic disease is one which is constantly present in a given area, though usually at low levels, whereas an epidemic is widespread and has a high incidence. A sporadic disease occurs now and then at low levels. * (English Citations of "endemic")

    Synonyms

    * (native to a particular area) native * (peculiar to a particular area) indigenous

    Antonyms

    * (native to a particular area) alien, introduced * (localized) systemic

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An individual or species that is endemic to a region.
  • * 2004 , (Richard Fortey), The Earth , Folio Society 2011, p. 34:
  • The species that appeared as a consequence were endemics ; that is, they were found nowhere else in the world.

    aboriginal

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • First according to historical or scientific records; original; indigenous; primitive.
  • * 1814 , , The Excursion , Longman et al. (publishers), [http://books.google.com/books?id=T18JAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA277&dq=aboriginal page 277]:
  • Green in the Church-yard, beautiful and green; / / And mantled o'er with aboriginal turf / And everlasting flowers.
  • Living in a land before colonization by the Europeans.
  • (Aboriginal)
  • Synonyms

    * (indigenous to a place) native, indigenous, autochthonous, endemic, original, first, earliest, primitive, ancient, primordial, primeval

    Derived terms

    * aboriginality * aboriginally

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An animal or plant native to a region.
  • * Charles Darwin
  • It may well be doubted whether this frog is an aboriginal of these islands.
  • (Aboriginal)
  • Usage notes

    * Using uncapitalized aboriginal to refer to people or anything associated with people may cause offence. * In Canada, style manuals recommend against using the noun Aboriginal for a person or people. * See also the usage notes under Aboriginal .

    References

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