Magnify vs Endeavor - What's the difference?

magnify | endeavor |


In lang=en terms the difference between magnify and endeavor

is that magnify is to make (something) appear larger by means of a lens, magnifying glass, telescope etc while endeavor is to attempt through application of effort (to do something); to try strenuously.

As verbs the difference between magnify and endeavor

is that magnify is to praise, glorify (someone or something, especially god) while endeavor is (obsolete) to exert oneself.

As a noun endeavor is

a sincere attempt; a determined or assiduous effort towards a specific goal.

magnify

English

Verb

  • To praise, glorify (someone or something, especially god).
  • * 1526 , (William Tyndale), trans. Bible , Acts X:
  • For they herde them speake with tonges, and magnify God.
  • * 1644 , (John Milton), (Aeropagitica) :
  • For he who freely magnifies what hath been nobly done, and fears not to declare as freely what might be done better, gives ye the best cov'nant of his fidelity [...].
  • To make (something) larger or more important.
  • * Grew
  • The least error in a small quantitybe proportionately magnified .
  • * {{quote-book, year=2006, author=(Edwin Black), title=Internal Combustion
  • , chapter=2 citation , passage=But through the oligopoly, charcoal fuel proliferated throughout London's trades and industries. By the 1200s, brewers and bakers, tilemakers, glassblowers, pottery producers, and a range of other craftsmen all became hour-to-hour consumers of charcoal. This only magnified the indispensable nature of the oligopolists.}}
  • To make (someone or something) appear greater or more important than it is; to intensify, exaggerate.
  • To make (something) appear larger by means of a lens, magnifying glass, telescope etc.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=July-August, author= Catherine Clabby
  • , magazine=(American Scientist), title= Focus on Everything , passage=Not long ago, it was difficult to produce photographs of tiny creatures with every part in focus. That’s because the lenses that are excellent at magnifying tiny subjects produce a narrow depth of field. A photo processing technique called focus stacking has changed that.}}
  • (intransitive, slang, obsolete) To have effect; to be of importance or significance.
  • (Spectator)

    Derived terms

    * magnifier * magnifying glass * magnification

    endeavor

    Alternative forms

    * (l) (UK)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A sincere attempt; a determined or assiduous effort towards a specific goal.
  • * 1640 , , part II, chapter 28:
  • And these three: 1. the law over them that have sovereign power; 2. their duty; 3. their profit: are one and the same thing contained in this sentence, Salus populi suprema lex ; by which must be understood, not the mere preservation of their lives, but generally their benefit and good. So that this is the general law for sovereigns: that they procure, to the uttermost of their endeavour , the good of the people.
  • * 1873 , , volume 2, page 184:
  • As we shall find it necessary, in our endeavours to bring electrical phenomena within the province of dynamics, to have our dynamical ideas in a state fit for direct application to physical questions we shall devote this chapter to an exposition of these dynamical ideas from a physical point of view.
  • Enterprise; assiduous or persistent activity.
  • * 1748 , David Hume, Enquiries concerning the human understanding and concerning the principles of moral (London: Oxford University Press, 1973), § 9:
  • The like has been the endeavour of critics, logicians, and even politicians .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To exert oneself.
  • * Alexander Pope:
  • And such were praised who but endeavoured well.
  • To attempt through application of effort (to do something); to try strenuously.
  • * 1748 , David Hume, Enquiries concerning the human understanding and concerning the principles of moral (London: Oxford University Press, 1973), § 2:
  • The other species of philosophers consider man in the light of a reasonable rather than an active being, and endeavour to form his understanding more than cultivate his manners.
  • (obsolete) To attempt (something).
  • * Ld. Chatham:
  • It is our duty to endeavour the recovery of these beneficial subjects.
  • * 1669 May 18, Sir Isaac Newton, Letter (to Francis Aston):
  • If you be affronted, it is better, in a foreign country, to pass it by in silence, and with a jest, though with some dishonour, than to endeavour revenge; for, in the first case, your credit's ne'er the worse when you return into England, or come into other company that have not heard of the quarrel.
  • To work with purpose.
  • *{{quote-magazine, year=2012, month=March-April
  • , author=John T. Jost , title=Social Justice: Is It in Our Nature (and Our Future)? , volume=100, issue=2, page=162 , magazine=(American Scientist) citation , passage=He draws eclectically on studies of baboons, descriptive anthropological accounts of hunter-gatherer societies and, in a few cases, the fossil record. With this biological framework in place, Corning endeavors to show that the capitalist system as currently practiced in the United States and elsewhere is manifestly unfair.}}

    Synonyms

    * strive