Else vs Another - What's the difference?

else | another |


As a adjective else

is other; in addition to previously mentioned items.

As a adverb else

is otherwise, if not.

As a conjunction else

is for otherwise; or else.

As a determiner another is

one more, in addition to a former number; a second or additional one, similar in likeness or in effect.

else

English

Adjective

(-)
  • Other; in addition to previously mentioned items.
  • Can anyone else (=any other person) help me?
    What else (=what other thing) is there?

    Usage notes

    * This adjective usually follows an indefinite or interrogative pronoun, as in the examples above. In other cases, the adjective (other) is typically used.

    Derived terms

    * anybody else * anyone else * anyplace else * anything else * anywhere else * elsewhere * elsewhither * everybody else * everyone else * everyplace else * everything else * everwhere else * nobody else * no one else * no place else * nothing else * nowhere else * something else * somewhere else * what else is new

    Adverb

    (-)
  • Otherwise, if not.
  • How else (=in what other way) can it be done?
    I'm busy Friday; when else (=what other time) works for you?

    Usage notes

    * (otherwise) This word frequently follows interrogative adverbs, such as (how), (why), and (when), as well as the derived (however), (why ever), and (whenever).

    Synonyms

    * otherwise

    Derived terms

    * or else

    Conjunction

    (English Conjunctions)
  • For otherwise; or else.
  • Then the Wronskian of ''f'' and ''g'' must be nonzero, else they could not be linearly independent.
  • (computing, in many programming languages and pseudocode) but if the condition of the previous (if) clause is false, do the following.
  • if (edits.Count == 0) { NoEditsLabel.Visible = true; }
    else { EditHistory.Show(edits); }

    See also

    * and * if * not * or * then

    Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    * (l), (l), (l), (l), (l) 1000 English basic words ----

    another

    English

    Alternative forms

    * anoda (Jamaican English) * anotha, anotha' (AAVE- eye dialect)

    Determiner

    (head)
  • One more, in addition to a former number; a second or additional one, similar in likeness or in effect.
  • :
  • *
  • *:Thus the red damask curtains which now shut out the fog-laden, drizzling atmosphere of the Marylebone Road, had cost a mere song, and yet they might have been warranted to last another thirty years. A great bargain also had been the excellent Axminster carpet which covered the floor;.
  • *{{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=July-August, author= Philip J. Bushnell
  • , magazine=(American Scientist), title= Solvents, Ethanol, Car Crashes & Tolerance , passage=Furthermore, this increase in risk is comparable to the risk of death from leukemia after long-term exposure to benzene, another solvent, which has the well-known property of causing this type of cancer.}}
  • Not the same; different.
  • :
  • *, chapter=22
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=From another point of view, it was a place without a soul. The well-to-do had hearts of stone; the rich were brutally bumptious; the Press, the Municipality, all the public men, were ridiculously, vaingloriously self-satisfied.}}
  • *1979 , Micheal Ende, The Neverending Story , p.53 , ISBN 0140386335
  • *:But that is another''''' story and will be told '''''another time.
  • *{{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= Katrina G. Claw
  • , title= Rapid Evolution in Eggs and Sperm , volume=101, issue=3, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=In plants, the ability to recognize self from nonself plays an important role in fertilization, because self-fertilization will result in less diverse offspring than fertilization with pollen from another individual.}}
  • Any or some; any different person, indefinitely; anyone else; someone else.
  • :
  • Usage notes

    * As a fused head construction another'' may have a possessive ''another's'' (''plural:'' ''others'', or possessive plural ''other ). It is much used in opposition to one; as, one went one way, another another. It is also used with one, in a reciprocal sense; as, "love one another," that is, let each love the other or others. ** **: These two imparadised in one another's arms. * Sometimes, the word "whole" is inserted into another by the common process of tmesis, giving: "a whole nother." This is a colloquialism that some recommend avoiding in formal writing. The prescribed alternatives are "a whole other" or "another whole." * There may be ambiguity: "I need another chair." may mean "My chair needs to be replaced." or "I need an additional chair [and I need to keep my existing chair]."

    Derived terms

    * another county heard from * one another * tomorrow is another day *

    References

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    Statistics

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