Idiosyncratic vs Eccentricity - What's the difference?

idiosyncratic | eccentricity |


As an adjective idiosyncratic

is peculiar to a specific individual; eccentric.

As a noun eccentricity is

the quality of being eccentric; any eccentric behaviour.

idiosyncratic

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • Peculiar to a specific individual; eccentric.
  • * 1886 , (Robert Louis Stevenson), Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde , ch. 9:
  • At the time, I set it down to some idiosyncratic , personal distaste . . . but I have since had reason to believe the cause to lie much deeper in the nature of man.
  • * 1891 , (George MacDonald), The Flight of the Shadow , ch. 12:
  • It was no merely idiosyncratic experience, for the youth had the same: it was love!
  • * 1982 , Michael Walsh, " Music: A Fresh Falstaff in Los Angeles," Time , 26 April:
  • British Director Ronald Eyre kept the action crisp; he was correctly content to execute the composer's wishes, rather than impose a fashionably idiosyncratic view of his own.

    eccentricity

    Noun

    (eccentricities)
  • The quality of being eccentric; any eccentric behaviour.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=5 , passage=Although the Celebrity was almost impervious to sarcasm, he was now beginning to exhibit visible signs of uneasiness, the consciousness dawning upon him that his eccentricity was not receiving the ovation it merited.}}
  • (mathematics) The ratio, constant for any particular conic section, of the distance of a point from the focus to its distance from the directrix.