Dirty vs Dust - What's the difference?

dirty | dust |


In lang=en terms the difference between dirty and dust

is that dirty is to become soiled while dust is to spray or cover something with fine powder or liquid.

As verbs the difference between dirty and dust

is that dirty is to make (something) dirty while dust is to remove dust from.

As an adjective dirty

is unclean; covered with or containing unpleasant substances such as dirt or grime.

As an adverb dirty

is in a dirty manner.

As a noun dust is

(uncountable) fine, dry particles of matter found in the air and covering the surface of objects, typically consisting of soil lifted up by the wind, pollen, hair, etc.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

dirty

English

Adjective

(er)
  • Unclean; covered with or containing unpleasant substances such as dirt or grime.
  • *
  • That makes one unclean; corrupting, infecting.
  • Morally unclean; obscene or indecent, especially sexually.
  • Dishonourable; violating accepted standards or rules.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-21, author=(Oliver Burkeman)
  • , volume=189, issue=2, page=27, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= The tao of tech , passage=The dirty secret of the internet is that all this distraction and interruption is immensely profitable.
  • Corrupt, illegal, or improper.
  • Out of tune.
  • Of color, discolored by impurities.
  • (computing) Containing data which need to be written back to a larger memory.
  • (slang) Carrying illegal drugs among one's possessions or inside of one's bloodstream.
  • (informal) Used as an intensifier, especially in conjunction with "great".
  • Sleety; gusty; stormy.
  • * M. Arnold
  • Storms of wind, clouds of dust, an angry, dirty sea.
  • * (Douglas Adams),
  • Rain type 17 was a dirty blatter battering against his windscreen so hard that it didn't make much odds whether he had his wipers on or off.

    Synonyms

    * (covered with or containing dirt) filthy, soiled, sordid, unclean, unwashed; see also * (violating accepted standards or rules) cheating, foul, unsporting, unsportsmanlike * (obtained illegally or by improper means) ill-gotten * (considered morally corrupt) base, dishonest, dishonorable, filthy, despicable, lousy, mean, sordid, unethical, vile * (considered obscene or indecent) indecent, lewd, obscene, raunchy, salacious * dingy, dullish, muddied, muddy

    Antonyms

    * (covered with or containing dirt) clean * (violating accepted standards or rules) sportsmanlike * bright, pure

    Derived terms

    * dirtiness * dirty bomb * dirty code * dirty dance * dirty dancing * dirty girl * dirty grease * Dirty Harry * dirty joke * dirty laundry * dirty look * dirty magazine * dirty mouth * dirty old man * dirty rice * dirty Sanchez * dirty talk * dirty weather * dirty word * dirty work * dirty wound * do someone dirty * filthy dirty * quick-and-dirty * quick and dirty

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • In a dirty manner.
  • Synonyms

    * (in a dirty manner) deceptively, dirtily, indecently, underhandedly

    Derived terms

    * talk dirty

    Verb

    (en-verb)
  • To make (something) dirty.
  • To stain or tarnish (somebody) with dishonor.
  • To debase by distorting the real nature of (something).
  • To become soiled.
  • Synonyms

    * (to make dirty) soil, taint; see also * (to stain or tarnish with dishonor) sully

    dust

    English

    Noun

  • (uncountable) Fine, dry particles of matter found in the air and covering the surface of objects, typically consisting of soil lifted up by the wind, pollen, hair, etc.
  • (countable) The act of cleaning by dusting.
  • * 2010 , Joan Busfield, Michael Paddon, Thinking About Children: Sociology and Fertility in Post-War England (page 150)
  • once they start school, I mean you can do a room out one day, the next day it only needs a dust , doesn't it?
  • (obsolete) A single particle of earth or other material.
  • * Shakespeare
  • to touch a dust of England's ground
  • The earth, as the resting place of the dead.
  • * Bible, Job vii. 21
  • I shall sleep in the dust .
  • The earthy remains of bodies once alive; the remains of the human body.
  • * Tennyson
  • And you may carve a shrine about my dust .
  • (figurative) Something worthless.
  • * Shakespeare
  • And by the merit of vile gold, dross, dust .
  • (figurative) A low or mean condition.
  • * Bible, 1 Sam. ii. 8
  • [God] raiseth up the poor out of the dust .
  • (slang, dated) cash; money (in reference to gold dust).
  • (mathematics) A totally disconnected set of points with a fractal structure.
  • Derived terms

    * angel dust * bite the dust * catch dust * dust ball * dustbin, dust bin * dust devil * dustbowl, dust bowl * dust bunny * dust filter * dustman * dust mask * dustpan * duststorm * dust trap * dust-up * dusty * fairy dust * goofer dust * pixie dust * smart dust, smartdust * stardust * turn to dust

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To remove dust from.
  • * , chapter=12
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=There were many wooden chairs for the bulk of his visitors, and two wicker armchairs with red cloth cushions for superior people. From the packing-cases had emerged some Indian clubs, […], and all these articles […] made a scattered and untidy decoration that Mrs. Clough assiduously dusted and greatly cherished.}}
  • To remove dust; to clean by removing dust.
  • Of a bird, to cover itself in sand or dry, dusty earth.
  • To spray or cover something with fine powder or liquid.
  • To leave; to rush off.
  • * 1939 , (Raymond Chandler), (The Big Sleep) , Penguin 2011, p. 75:
  • He added in a casual tone: ‘The girl can dust . I'd like to talk to you a little, soldier.’
  • To reduce to a fine powder; to levigate.
  • (Sprat)

    Derived terms

    * dust off * duster

    See also

    * vacuum cleaner