Dry vs Parch - What's the difference?

dry | parch |


As verbs the difference between dry and parch

is that dry is to lose moisture while parch is to burn the surface of, to scorch.

As a adjective dry

is free from liquid or moisture.

As a noun parch is

the condition of being parched.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

dry

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) drye, drie, dri, drige, dryge, . See also (l), (l), (l).

Alternative forms

* (l) (obsolete)

Adjective

(en-adj)
  • Free from liquid or moisture.
  • * Addison
  • The weather, we agreed, was too dry for the season.
  • * Prescott
  • Not a dry eye was to be seen in the assembly.
  • (chemistry) Free of water in any state; anhydrous.
  • Thirsty; needing drink.
  • * (William Shakespeare)
  • Give the dry fool drink.
  • (of an alcoholic beverage) Lacking sugar or low in sugar; not sweet.
  • Maintaining temperance; void or abstinent from alcoholic beverages.
  • (of a person or joke) Subtly humorous, yet without mirth.
  • * (Washington Irving)
  • He was rather a dry , shrewd kind of body.
  • (of a scientist or his laboratory) Not working with chemical or biological matter, but, rather, doing computations.
  • (masonry) Built without mortar; dry-stone.
  • *
  • (of animals) Not giving milk.
  • Lacking interest or amusement; barren; unembellished.
  • * (Alexander Pope)
  • These epistles will become less dry , more susceptible of ornament.
  • (fine arts) Exhibiting a sharp, frigid preciseness of execution, or lacking delicate contours and soft transitions of colour.
  • Synonyms
    * (free from liquid or moisture) arid, parched
    Antonyms
    * (free from liquid or moisture) wet * (abstinent from alcohol) wet * wet
    Derived terms
    * bone dry * dry as a bone * dry as a dead dingo’s donger * dry cough * dry hole * dry ice * drily * dry run * dryly * dryness * dry spell * drywall * dry weight * like watching paint dry

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl)

    Verb

  • To lose moisture.
  • The clothes dried on the line.
  • To remove moisture from.
  • Devin dried her eyes with a handkerchief.
  • (ambitransitive, figurative) To cease or cause to cease.
  • Their sources of income dried up.
    The stream of chatter dried up.
    Derived terms
    * drier * dryer * dry out * dry up * nondrying
    See also
    * desiccant * desiccate * desiccation

    parch

    English

    Verb

  • To burn the surface of, to scorch.
  • The sun today could parch cement.
  • To roast, as dry grain.
  • * Bible, Leviticus xxiii. 14
  • Ye shall eat neither bread, nor parched corn.
  • To dry to extremity; to shrivel with heat.
  • The patient's mouth is parched from fever.
  • (colloquial) To make thirsty.
  • We're parched , hon. Could you send up an ale from the cooler?
  • (archaic) To boil something slowly (Still used in Lancashire in , a type of mushy peas ).
  • To become superficially burnt; be become sunburned.
  • The locals watched, amused, as the tourists parched in the sun, having neglected to apply sunscreen or bring water.

    Noun

    (parches)
  • The condition of being parched.
  • * 1982 , (TC Boyle), Water Music , Penguin 2006, p. 64:
  • Yet here he is, not at the head, but somewhere toward the rear of the serpentine queue wending its way through all this parch […].
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