Drunk vs Lush - What's the difference?

drunk | lush |


As adjectives the difference between drunk and lush

is that drunk is in a state of intoxication caused by the consumption of excessive alcohol, usually by drinking alcoholic beverages while lush is (obsolete) lax; slack; limp; flexible.

As nouns the difference between drunk and lush

is that drunk is a habitual drinker, especially one who is frequently intoxicated while lush is (pejorative) drunkard, sot, alcoholic.

As verbs the difference between drunk and lush

is that drunk is while lush is to drink liquor to excess.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

drunk

English

Adjective

(er)
  • In a state of intoxication caused by the consumption of excessive alcohol, usually by drinking alcoholic beverages.
  • (usually followed by with or on) Elated or emboldened.
  • Drunk with power he immediately ordered a management reshuffle.
  • * Macaulay
  • drunk with recent prosperity
  • Drenched or saturated with moisture or liquid.
  • * Bible, Deuteronomy xxxii. 42
  • I will make mine arrows drunk with blood.

    Synonyms

    * (intoxicated from alcohol) blitzed, drunken, ebrious, hammered, pissed, tipsy, wasted, smashed; see also

    Derived terms

    (terms derived from drunk) * drunkard * drunk as a skunk * drunk driver * drunk driving * drunken * drunkenness * punch drunk * drunk tank

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A habitual drinker, especially one who is frequently intoxicated.
  • * 1971 , William S. Burroughs, The Wild Boys: A Book of the Dead , page 10
  • Another drunk is sleeping in dangerous proximity to a brush fire.
  • A drinking-bout; a period of drunkenness.
  • * 1858 , "A Scarcity of Jurors—Cangemi's Third Trial," New York Times , 8 Jun., p. 4:
  • Gen. G. had been on a long drunk from July last until Christmas.
  • A drunken state.
  • * 2006 , Patrick McCabe, Winterwood , Bloomsbury 2007, p. 10:
  • Here – help yourself to another drop there, Redmond! By the time we've got a good drunk on us there'll be more crack in this valley than the night I pissed on the electric fence!

    Derived terms

    * cheap drunk * expensive drunk * good drunk

    Synonyms

    * (habitual drinker) alcoholic, drunkard, pisshead, piss artist, sot; see also

    Verb

    (head)
  • (Southern US) (drink)
  • English irregular past participles

    lush

    English

    (wikipedia lush)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) . Related to (m). More at (l), (l).

    Adjective

    (er)
  • (obsolete) Lax; slack; limp; flexible.
  • (dialectal) Mellow; soft; (of ground or soil) easily turned.
  • (of vegetation) Dense, teeming with life.
  • * 2006 , Stefani Jackenthal, New York Times
  • Some of the world’s best rain forest and volcanic hiking can be found within the lush canopied Caribbean trail systems. Chock-full of waterfalls and hot springs, bright-colored birds and howling monkeys, flora-lined trails cut through thick, fragrant forests and up cloud-covered mountains.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-01
  • , author=Nancy Langston , title=The Fraught History of a Watery World , volume=101, issue=1, page=59 , magazine= citation , passage=European adventurers found themselves within a watery world, a tapestry of streams, channels, wetlands, lakes and lush riparian meadows enriched by floodwaters from the Mississippi River.}}
  • (slang, of food) Luxuriant, delicious.
  • That meal was lush ! We have to go that restaurant again sometime!
  • (British, slang) Beautiful, sexy.
  • Boys with long hair are lush !
  • (British, Canada, slang) Amazing, cool, fantastic, wicked.
  • Your voice is lush , Lucy! I could listen to it all day!

    Etymology 2

    Perhaps a humorous use of the preceding word, or perhaps from (etyl) .An Etymological Dictionary of Modern English (ISBN 0486122867)

    Noun

    (es)
  • (pejorative) Drunkard, sot, alcoholic.
  • Intoxicating liquor.
  • Verb

    (es)
  • To drink liquor to excess.
  • To drink (liquor) to excess.
  • Derived terms
    * lushing * lusher

    References

    Anagrams

    * (l)