Species vs Dromaeognathous - What's the difference?

species | dromaeognathous |


As a noun species

is .

As an adjective dromaeognathous is

(ornithology) possessing a palatal structure akin to the emu and the other (now extinct) species of the genus dromaius .

species

Noun

(species)
  • A type or kind of thing.
  • * (Richard Holt Hutton) (1826-1897)
  • What is called spiritualism should, I think, be called a mental species of materialism.
  • # A group of plants or animals having similar appearance.
  • #* {{quote-magazine, date=2012-01
  • , author=Donald Worster, volume=100, issue=1, page=70, magazine=(American Scientist) , title= A Drier and Hotter Future , passage=Phoenix and Lubbock are both caught in severe drought, and it is going to get much worse. We may see many such [dust] storms in the decades ahead, along with species extinctions, radical disturbance of ecosystems, and intensified social conflict over land and water. Welcome to the Anthropocene, the epoch when humans have become a major geological and climatic force.}}
  • # A rank in the classification of organisms, below genus and above subspecies; a taxon at that rank.
  • #* 1859 , (Charles Darwin), (On the Origin of Species) :
  • Hence, in determining whether a form should be ranked as a species or a variety, the opinion of naturalists having sound judgment and wide experience seems the only guide to follow.
  • #*
  • Firstly, I continue to base most species treatments on personally collected material, rather than on herbarium plants.
  • #* {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= David Van Tassel], [http://www.americanscientist.org/authors/detail/lee-dehaan Lee DeHaan
  • , title= Wild Plants to the Rescue , volume=101, issue=3, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Plant breeding is always a numbers game.
  • # (label) A mineral with a unique chemical formula whose crystals belong to a unique crystallographic system.
  • An image, an appearance, a spectacle.
  • # (label) The image of something cast on a surface, or reflected from a surface, or refracted through a lens or telescope; a reflection.
  • # Visible or perceptible presentation; appearance; something perceived.
  • #* (John Dryden) (1631-1700)
  • Wit,the faculty of imagination in the writer, which searches over all the memory for the species or ideas of those things which it designs to represent.
  • #* (Isaac Newton) (1642-1727)
  • the species of the letters illuminated with indigo and violet
  • # A public spectacle or exhibition.
  • (Francis Bacon)
  • (label) Either of the two elements of the Eucharist after they have been consecrated, so named because they retain the image of the bread and wine before their transubstantiation into the body and blood of Christ.
  • Coin, or coined silver, gold, or other metal, used as a circulating medium; specie.
  • * (John Arbuthnot) (1667-1735)
  • There was, in the splendour of the Roman empire, a less quantity of current species in Europe than there is now.
  • A component part of compound medicine; a simple.
  • An officinal mixture or compound powder of any kind; especially, one used for making an aromatic tea or tisane; a tea mixture.
  • Usage notes

    * (specie) is a separate word that means coin money, not the singular version of (species). * See (species name).

    Derived terms

    * chemical species * endangered species * microspecies * ring species * subspecies

    See also

    * family * genus * kingdom * order * phylum * race * variety * binomial nomenclature

    dromaeognathous

    English

    Alternative forms

    *

    Adjective

    (-)
  • (ornithology) Possessing a palatal structure akin to the emu and the other (now extinct) species of the genus Dromaius .
  • * 1895 : Eugene William Oates and William Thomas Blanford, Birds , volume 3, page v (Taylor and Francis)
  • The fourth principal type, the dromæognathous , is not found in any Indian birds.
  • * 1921 : William Aitcheson Haswell, A Text-book of Zoology , volume 2, page 431 (3rd Ed.; Macmillan)
  • From the fact that the dromæognathous skull is more reptilian than any other type, it would seem that the Ratitæ diverged early from the carinate stock.
  • * 1937 : Zoological Society of London, Proceedings , volume 107, part 2, page 225
  • It is well known that the membrane bones of the ostrich palate have a dromæognathous arrangement which is closer to the lacertilian plan than to the characteristic bird type where palatines and pterygoids slide upon a central rostrum.
  • * 1938 : Harry Forbes Witherby, Francis Charles Robert Jourdain, Norman Frederic Ticehurst, and Bernard William Tucker, The Handbook of British Birds , volume 1, page xxvi (7th Ed.; H. F. & G. Witherby)
  • Ægithognathous.—One of the four types of palatal structure distinguished by Huxley. The Dromæognathous type, with large vomer,¹ found in Ratites (Ostrich-like birds) is sharply defined from the others (in which the vomer is more or less reduced), but the latter are by no means so clearly separated from one another, and are connected to a great extent by intermediate conditions.

    Derived terms

    * dromaeognathism

    References