Drill vs Root - What's the difference?

drill | root | Synonyms |

Drill is a synonym of root.


As verbs the difference between drill and root

is that drill is to create (a hole) by removing material with a (tool) while root is (computing|slang|transitive) to break into a computer system and obtain root access or root can be to turn up or dig with the snout or root can be (intransitive|with for|us) to cheer to show support for.

As nouns the difference between drill and root

is that drill is a tool used to remove material so as to create a hole, typically by plunging a rotating cutting bit into a stationary workpiece or drill can be an old world monkey of west africa, (taxlink), similar in appearance to the mandrill, but lacking the colorful face or drill can be a strong, durable cotton fabric with a strong bias (diagonal) in the weave while root is the part of a plant, generally underground, that absorbs water and nutrients or root can be (australia|new zealand|vulgar|slang) an act of sexual intercourse.

drill

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl)

Verb

(en verb)
  • To create (a hole) by removing material with a (tool).
  • Drill a small hole to start the screw in the right direction.
  • To practice, especially in a military context.
  • They drilled daily to learn the routine exactly.
  • (ergative) To cause to drill (practice); to train in military arts.
  • The sergeant was up by 6:00 every morning, drilling his troops.
  • * Macaulay
  • He [Frederic the Great] drilled his people, as he drilled his grenadiers.
  • To repeat an idea frequently in order to encourage someone to remember it.
  • The instructor drilled into us the importance of reading the instructions.
  • To investigate or examine something in more detail or at a different level
  • Drill deeper and you may find the underlying assumptions faulty.
  • To hit or kick with a lot of power.
  • * 2006 , Joe Coon, The Perfect Game ,
  • He did get their attention when he drilled the ball dead center into the hole for an opening birdie.
  • * 2007 , Craig Cowell, Muddy Sunday ,
  • Without compromising he drilled the ball home, leaving Dynamos' ill-fated keeper diving for fresh air.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2010 , date=December 29 , author=Chris Whyatt , title=Chelsea 1 - 0 Bolton , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=Bolton were then just inches from taking the lead, but the dangerous-looking Taylor drilled just wide after picking up a loose ball following Jose Bosingwa's poor attempted clearance.}}
  • (slang, vulgar) To have sexual intercourse with; to penetrate.
  • Is this going to take long? I've got a hot date to drill the flautist at the symphony tonight.'' - Brian Griffin, ''
  • To cause to flow in drills or rills or by trickling; to drain by trickling.
  • waters drilled through a sandy stratum
    (Thomson)
  • To sow (seeds) by dribbling them along a furrow or in a row.
  • (obsolete) To entice or allure; to decoy; with on .
  • * Addison
  • She drilled him on to five-and-fifty, and will drop him in his old age
  • (obsolete) To cause to slip or waste away by degrees.
  • * Jonathan Swift
  • This accident hath drilled away the whole summer.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A tool used to remove material so as to create a hole, typically by plunging a rotating cutting bit into a stationary workpiece.
  • The portion of a drilling tool that drives the bit.
  • An agricultural implement for making holes for sowing seed, and sometimes so formed as to contain seeds and drop them into the hole made.
  • A light furrow or channel made to put seed into, when sowing.
  • A row of seed sown in a furrow.
  • An activity done as an exercise or practice (especially a military exercise).
  • * , chapter=7
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients , passage=“[…] if you call my duds a ‘livery’ again there'll be trouble. It's bad enough to go around togged out like a life saver on a drill day, but I can stand that 'cause I'm paid for it. What I won't stand is to have them togs called a livery. […]”}}
  • (obsolete) A small trickling stream; a rill.
  • * Sandys
  • Springs through the pleasant meadows pour their drills .
  • Any of several molluscs, of the genus , that drill holes in the shells of other animals.
  • (Ocenebrinae)
    Derived terms
    * dental drill * dentist's drill * drill barrow * drill bow * drill harrow * drill plough, drill plow * drill sergeant

    Etymology 2

    Probably of African origin; compare mandrill.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An Old World monkey of West Africa, , similar in appearance to the mandrill, but lacking the colorful face.
  • Etymology 3

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A strong, durable cotton fabric with a strong bias (diagonal) in the weave.
  • Derived terms
    * (l), (l)
    Synonyms
    * (l)

    root

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) ; cognate with wort and radix.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The part of a plant, generally underground, that absorbs water and nutrients.
  • This tree's roots can go as deep as twenty metres underground.
  • A root vegetable.
  • *
  • two fields which should have been sown with roots in the early summer were not sown because the ploughing had not been completed early enough.
  • The part of a tooth extending into the bone holding the tooth in place.
  • Root damage is a common problem of overbrushing.
  • The part of a hair under the skin that holds the hair in place.
  • The root is the only part of the hair that is alive.
  • The part of a hair near the skin that has not been dyed, permed, or otherwise treated.
  • He dyed his hair black last month, so the grey roots can be seen.
  • The primary source; origin.
  • The love of money is the root of all evil.
  • * John Locke
  • They were the roots out of which sprang two distinct people.
  • (arithmetic) Of a number or expression, a number which, when raised to a specified power, yields the specified number or expression.
  • The cube root of 27 is 3.
  • (arithmetic) A square root (understood if no power is specified; in which case, “the root of” is often abbreviated to “root”).
  • Multiply by root 2.
  • (analysis) A zero (of a function).
  • (graph theory, computing) The single node of a tree that has no parent.
  • (linguistic morphology) The primary lexical unit of a word, which carries the most significant aspects of semantic content and cannot be reduced into smaller constituents. Inflectional stems often derive from roots.
  • (philology) A word from which another word or words are derived.
  • (music) The fundamental tone of any chord; the tone from whose harmonics, or overtones, a chord is composed.
  • (Busby)
  • The lowest place, position, or part.
  • * Milton
  • deep to the roots of hell
  • * Southey
  • the roots of the mountains
  • (computing) In UNIX terminology, the first user account with complete access to the operating system and its configuration, found at the root of the directory structure.
  • (computing) The person who manages accounts on a UNIX system.
  • (computing) The highest directory of a directory structure which may contain both files and subdirectories. (rfex)
  • Synonyms
    * (source) basis, origin, source * (zero of a function) zero * (word from which another is derived) etymon * superuser (), root account, root user
    Antonyms
    * (zero of a function) pole
    Holonyms
    * (zero of a function) kernel
    Derived terms
    * cube root * functional root * put down roots * root canal * root cause * rootkit * roots * roots music * rootsy * square root * strictly roots * take root * taproot * root gap

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (computing, slang, transitive) To break into a computer system and obtain root access.
  • We rooted his box and planted a virus on it.
  • To fix the root; to enter the earth, as roots; to take root and begin to grow.
  • * Mortimer
  • In deep grounds the weeds root deeper.
  • * '>citation
  • To be firmly fixed; to be established.
  • * Bishop Fell
  • If any irregularity chanced to intervene and to cause misapprehensions, he gave them not leave to root and fasten by concealment.

    See also

    * (linguistics) stem

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) . Cognate with rodent. Cognate with Dutch wroeten.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To turn up or dig with the snout.
  • A pig roots the earth for truffles.
  • (by extension) To seek favour or advancement by low arts or grovelling servility; to fawn.
  • To rummage, to search as if by digging in soil.
  • rooting about in a junk-filled drawer
  • To root out; to abolish.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I will go root away the noisome weeds.
  • * Bible, Deuteronomy xxix. 28
  • The Lord rooted them out of their land and cast them into another land.
  • (Australia, New Zealand, vulgar, slang) To have sexual intercourse.
  • Usage notes
    * The Australian/New Zealand sexual sense is somewhat milder than fuck but still quite coarse, certainly not for polite conversation. The sexual sense will often be understood, unless care is taken with the context to make the rummage sense clear, or 'root through' or 'root around' is used. The past participle rooted'' is equivalent to ''fucked'' in the figurative sense of broken or tired, but ''rooting'' is only the direct verbal sense, not an all-purpose intensive like ''fucking .
    Synonyms
    * (rummage) dig out, root out, rummage * (have sexual intercourse) screw, bang, drill (US), shag (British) - See also
    Derived terms
    * root about * rooted * root out * root up

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (Australia, New Zealand, vulgar, slang) An act of sexual intercourse.
  • Fancy a root ?
  • (Australia, New Zealand, vulgar, slang) A sexual partner.
  • Usage notes
    * The Australian/New Zealand sexual sense of root'' is somewhat milder than ''fuck'' but still quite coarse, certainly not for polite conversation. The normal usage is ''to have a root or similar.
    Synonyms
    * (act of sexual intercourse) screw (qualifier), shag (UK); see also * (sexual partner) screw (US)

    Etymology 3

    Possibly an alteration of , influenced by hoot

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (intransitive, with for, US) To cheer to show support for.
  • * 1908 ,
  • Let me root', '''root''', ' root for the home team,
  • (US) To hope for the success of. Rendered as 'root for'.
  • I'm rooting for you, don't let me down!
    Synonyms
    * (cheer) barrack (qualifier), cheer on

    Anagrams

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