Burrow vs Dredge - What's the difference?

burrow | dredge |


As nouns the difference between burrow and dredge

is that burrow is a tunnel or hole, often as dug by a small creature while dredge is any instrument used to gather or take by dragging; as: or dredge can be a mixture of oats and barley.

As verbs the difference between burrow and dredge

is that burrow is to dig a tunnel or hole while dredge is to make a channel deeper or wider using a dredge or dredge can be to coat moistened food with a powder, such as flour or sugar.

burrow

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A tunnel or hole, often as dug by a small creature.
  • * 1922 , (Margery Williams), (The Velveteen Rabbit)
  • But very soon he grew to like it, for the Boy used to talk to him, and made nice tunnels' for him under the bedclothes that he said were like the ' burrows the real rabbits lived in.
  • (mining) A heap or heaps of rubbish or refuse.
  • A mound.
  • An incorporated town.
  • (Webster 1913)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To dig a tunnel or hole.
  • dredge

    English

    Etymology 1

    (Dredging) From (etyl) dreg-boat'' (from (etyl) *''drecg(e) ) or alternatively from (etyl) dregghe, probably ultimately from the same root as drag.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Any instrument used to gather or take by dragging; as:
  • # A dragnet for taking up oysters, etc., from their beds.
  • # A dredging machine.
  • # An iron frame, with a fine net attached, used in collecting animals living at the bottom of the sea.
  • Very fine mineral matter held in suspension in water.
  • (Raymond)

    Verb

    (dredg)
  • to make a channel deeper or wider using a dredge
  • to bring something to the surface with a dredge
  • (Usually with up) to unearth, such as an unsavoury past
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) dragie, via (etyl) from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (dredg)
  • to coat moistened food with a powder, such as flour or sugar
  • Etymology 3

    (etyl) dragge, (etyl) .

    Noun

  • A mixture of oats and barley.
  • (Kersey)