Snarl vs Drawl - What's the difference?

snarl | drawl | Related terms |

Snarl is a related term of drawl.


As nouns the difference between snarl and drawl

is that snarl is a knot or complication of hair, thread, or the like, difficult to disentangle; entanglement; hence, intricate complication; embarrassing difficulty while drawl is a way of speaking slowly while lengthening vowel sounds and running words together characteristic of some.

As verbs the difference between snarl and drawl

is that snarl is to form raised work upon the outer surface of (thin metal ware) by the repercussion of a snarling iron upon the inner surface while drawl is to drag on slowly and heavily; while or dawdle away time indolently.

snarl

English

(wikipedia snarl)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A knot or complication of hair, thread, or the like, difficult to disentangle; entanglement; hence, intricate complication; embarrassing difficulty.
  • The act of snarling; a growl; a surly or peevish expression; an angry contention.
  • A growl, as of an angry or surly dog, or similar; grumbling sounds
  • Synonyms

    * (entangled situation) imbroglio

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To form raised work upon the outer surface of (thin metal ware) by the repercussion of a snarling iron upon the inner surface.
  • To entangle; to complicate; to involve in knots.
  • to snarl a skein of thread
  • * Spenser
  • And from her back her garments she did tear, / And from her head oft rent her snarled hair
  • To embarrass; to ensnare.
  • * Latimer
  • [the] question that they would have snarled him with
  • To growl, as an angry or surly dog; to gnarl; to utter grumbling sounds.
  • To speak crossly; to talk in rude, surly terms.
  • * Dryden
  • It is malicious and unmanly to snarl at the little lapses of a pen, from which Virgil himself stands not exempted.

    Antonyms

    * unsnarl

    Anagrams

    * ----

    drawl

    English

    Verb

  • To drag on slowly and heavily; while or dawdle away time indolently.
  • To utter or pronounce in a dull, spiritless tone, as if by dragging out the utterance.
  • To move slowly and heavily; move in a dull, slow, lazy mannner.
  • To speak with a slow, spiritless utterance, from affectation, laziness, or lack of interest.
  • * Landor
  • Theologians and moralists talk mostly in a drawling and dreaming way about it.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • a way of speaking slowly while lengthening vowel sounds and running words together. Characteristic of some .
  • See also

    * brogue * lilt * lisp * twang