Pulled vs Dragged - What's the difference?

pulled | dragged |


As verbs the difference between pulled and dragged

is that pulled is (pull) while dragged is (drag).

pulled

English

Verb

(head)
  • (pull)

  • pull

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • to apply a force to (an object) so that it comes toward the person or thing applying the force
  • * Bible, Genesis viii. 9
  • He put forth his hand and pulled her in.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Ne'er pull your hat upon your brows.
  • To gather with the hand, or by drawing toward oneself; to pluck.
  • to pull''' fruit from a tree; to '''pull''' flax; to '''pull a finch
  • to apply a force such that an object comes toward the person or thing applying the force
  • You're going to have to pull harder to get that cork out of the bottle.
  • To attract or net; to pull in.
  • * Marcella Ridlen Ray, Changing and Unchanging Face of United States Civil Society
  • Television, a favored source of news and information, pulls the largest share of advertising monies.
  • To draw apart; to tear; to rend.
  • * Bible, Lam. iii. 11
  • He hath turned aside my ways, and pulled me in pieces; he hath made me desolate.
  • (ambitransitive, UK, Ireland, slang) to persuade (someone) to have sex with one
  • I pulled at the club last night.
    He's pulled that bird over there.
  • to remove (something), especially from public circulation or availability
  • Each day, they pulled the old bread and set out fresh loaves.
  • (informal) to do or perform
  • He regularly pulls 12-hour days, sometimes 14.
    You'll be sent home if you pull another stunt like that.
  • to retrieve or generate for use
  • I'll have to pull a part number for that.
  • * 2006 , Michael Bellomo, Joel Elad, How to Sell Anything on Amazon...and Make a Fortune!
  • They'll go through their computer system and pull a report of all your order fulfillment records for the time period you specify.
  • to toss a frisbee with the intention of launching the disc across the length of a field
  • to row
  • * 1874 , (Marcus Clarke), (For the Term of His Natural Life) Chapter VI
  • It had been a sort of race hitherto, and the rowers, with set teeth and compressed lips, had pulled stroke for stroke.
  • To strain (a muscle, tendon, ligament, etc.).
  • (video games, ambitransitive) To draw (a hostile non-player character) into combat, or toward or away from some location or target.
  • * 2003 April 9, "Richard Lawson" (username), " Monual's Willful Ignorance", in alt.games.everquest, Usenet:
  • …we had to clear a long hallway, run up half way, pull the boss mob to us, and engage.
  • * 2004 October 18, "Stush" (username), " Re: focus pull", in alt.games.dark-age-of-camelot, Usenet:
  • Basically buff pet, have it pull lots of mobs, shield pet, chain heal pet, have your aoe casters finish off hurt mobs once pet gets good aggro.
  • * 2005 August 2, "Brian" (username), " Re: How to tank Stratholme undead pulls?", in alt.games.warcraft, Usenet:
  • This is the only thing that should get you to break off from your position, is to pull something off the healer.
  • * 2007 April 10, "John Salerno" (username), " Re: Managing the Command Buttons", in alt.games.warcraft, Usenet:
  • You could also set a fire trap, pull the mob toward it, then send in your pet….
  • * 2008 August 18, "Mark (newsgroups)" (username), " Re: I'm a priest now!", in alt.games.warcraft, Usenet:
  • Shield yourself, pull' with Mind Blast if you want, or merely ' pull with SW:P to save mana, then wand, fear if you need to, but use the lowest rank fear.
  • to score a certain amount of points in a sport.
  • * How many points did you pull today, Albert?
  • (horse-racing) To hold back, and so prevent from winning.
  • The favourite was pulled .
  • (printing, dated) To take or make (a proof or impression); so called because hand presses were worked by pulling a lever.
  • (cricket) To strike the ball in a particular manner. (See noun sense.)
  • * R. H. Lyttelton
  • Never pull a straight fast ball to leg.
  • (UK, slang) To pour beer from a pump, keg, or other source.
  • Let's stop at Finnigan's. The barkeep ''pulls'' a good pint.

    Synonyms

    * drag, tow, tug, yank * score * (to remove from circulation) recall, withdraw, yank * (sense) carry out, complete, do, execute, perform * (to retrieve or generate for use) generate, get, get hold of, get one's hands on, lay one's hands on, obtain, retrieve * score

    Antonyms

    * push, repel, shove

    Derived terms

    See also pulling * it's not the whistle that pulls the train * overpull * pull a... * pull about * pull a face * pull a fast one * pull ahead * pull away * pull back * pull down * pull for * pull in * pulling * pull in one's horns * pull off * pull oneself together * pull one's weight * pull out * pull out all the stops * pull out of the fire * pull over * pull-quote * pull rank * pull round * pull somebody's leg * pull the other one * * pull the wool over someone's eyes * pull through * pull together * pull up

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An act of pulling (applying force)
  • He gave the hair a sharp pull and it came out.
  • * Jonathan Swift
  • I awakened with a violent pull upon the ring which was fastened at the top of my box.
  • An attractive force which causes motion towards the source
  • The spaceship came under the pull of the gas giant.
    iron fillings drawn by the pull of a magnet
    She took a pull on her cigarette.
  • Any device meant to be pulled, as a lever, knob, handle, or rope
  • a zipper pull
  • (slang, dated) Something in one's favour in a comparison or a contest; an advantage; means of influencing.
  • In weights the favourite had the pull .
  • Appeal or attraction (as of a movie star)
  • (Internet, uncountable) The situation where a client sends out a request for data from a server, as in server pull'', ''pull technology
  • A journey made by rowing
  • * 1874 , (Marcus Clarke), (For the Term of His Natural Life) Chapter V
  • As Blunt had said, the burning ship lay a good twelve miles from the Malabar, and the pull was a long and a weary one. Once fairly away from the protecting sides of the vessel that had borne them thus far on their dismal journey, the adventurers seemed to have come into a new atmosphere.
  • (dated) A contest; a struggle.
  • a wrestling pull
    (Carew)
  • (obsolete, poetic) Loss or violence suffered.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Two pulls at once; / His lady banished, and a limb lopped off.
  • (slang) The act of drinking.
  • to take a pull at a mug of beer
    (Charles Dickens)
  • (cricket) A kind of stroke by which a leg ball is sent to the off side, or an off ball to the side.
  • * R. A. Proctor
  • The pull is not a legitimate stroke, but bad cricket.

    Synonyms

    * (act of pulling) tug, yank * (attractive force) attraction * (device meant to be pulled) handle, knob, lever, rope * (influence) influence, sway

    Antonyms

    * (act of pulling) push, shove * (attractive force) repulsion * (device meant to be pulled) button, push, push button * (influence)

    Derived terms

    * on the pull * pull cord * ring-pull

    dragged

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (drag)
  • Synonyms

    * drug

    drag

    English

    (wikipedia drag)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) . More at (l).

    Verb

  • To pull along a surface or through a medium, sometimes with difficulty.
  • To move slowly.
  • To act or proceed slowly or without enthusiasm; to be reluctant.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=September-October, author= James R. Carter
  • , magazine=(American Scientist), title= Flowers and Ribbons of Ice , passage=Dragging yourself out of a warm bed in the early hours of a wintry morning to go for a hike in the woods: It’s not an easy thing for some to do, but the visual treasures that await could be well worth the effort. If the weather conditions and the local flora are just right, you might come across fleeting, delicate frozen formations sprouting from certain plant stems, literally a garden of ice.}}
  • To move onward heavily, laboriously, or slowly; to advance with weary effort; to go on lingeringly.
  • * Byron
  • The day drags through, though storms keep out the sun.
  • * Gay
  • Long, open panegyric drags at best.
  • To draw along (something burdensome); hence, to pass in pain or with difficulty.
  • * Dryden
  • have dragged a lingering life
  • To serve as a clog or hindrance; to hold back.
  • * Russell
  • A propeller is said to drag when the sails urge the vessel faster than the revolutions of the screw can propel her.
  • (computing) To move (an item) on the computer display by means of a mouse or other input device.
  • To inadvertently rub or scrape on a surface.
  • To perform as a drag queen or drag king.
  • (soccer) To hit or kick off target.
  • * November 17 2012 , BBC Sport: Arsenal 5-2 Tottenham [http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/football/20278355]
  • Arsenal were struggling for any sort of rhythm and Aaron Lennon dragged an effort inches wide as Tottenham pressed for a second.
  • To fish with a dragnet.
  • To break (land) by drawing a drag or harrow over it; to harrow.
  • (figurative) To search exhaustively, as if with a dragnet.
  • * Tennyson
  • while I dragged my brains for such a song
    Derived terms
    * drag one's feet * dragline * what the cat dragged in

    Noun

  • (uncountable) Resistance of the air (or some other fluid) to something moving through it.
  • When designing cars, manufacturers have to take drag into consideration.
  • (countable, foundry) The bottom part of a sand casting mold.
  • (countable) A device dragged along the bottom of a body of water in search of something, e.g. a dead body, or in fishing.
  • (countable, informal) A puff on a cigarette or joint.
  • (countable, slang) Someone or something that is annoying or frustrating; an obstacle to progress or enjoyment.
  • Travelling to work in the rush hour is a real drag .
  • * J. D. Forbes
  • My lectures were only a pleasure to me, and no drag .
  • (countable, slang) Someone or something that is disappointing.
  • (countable, slang) Horse-drawn wagon or buggy.
  • (Thackeray)
  • (countable, slang) Street, as in 'main drag'.
  • (countable) The scent-path left by dragging a fox, for training hounds to follow scents.
  • to run a drag
  • (countable, snooker) A large amount of backspin on the cue ball, causing the cue ball to slow down.
  • A heavy harrow for breaking up ground.
  • A kind of sledge for conveying heavy objects; also, a kind of low car or handcart.
  • a stone drag
  • (metallurgy) The bottom part of a flask or mould, the upper part being the cope.
  • (masonry) A steel instrument for completing the dressing of soft stone.
  • (nautical) The difference between the speed of a screw steamer under sail and that of the screw when the ship outruns the screw; or between the propulsive effects of the different floats of a paddle wheel.
  • Anything towed in the water to retard a ship's progress, or to keep her head up to the wind; especially, a canvas bag with a hooped mouth (drag sail), so used.
  • A skid or shoe for retarding the motion of a carriage wheel.
  • Motion affected with slowness and difficulty, as if clogged.
  • * Hazlitt
  • Had a drag in his walk.
    Derived terms
    * drag race * main drag

    Etymology 2

    Possibly from (etyl) Douglas Harper, "camp (n.)" in Online Etymology Dictionary , 2001ff

    Noun

    (-)
  • (uncountable, slang) Women's clothing worn by men for the purpose of entertainment.
  • He performed in drag .
  • (uncountable, slang) Any type of clothing or costume associated with a particular occupation or subculture.
  • corporate drag
    Derived terms
    * drag king * drag queen * drag show

    References

    * Flight, 1913, p. 126] attributing to [[w:Archibald Low, Archibald Low] *