Ower vs Dower - What's the difference?

ower | dower |


As nouns the difference between ower and dower

is that ower is a person who owes money while dower is (legal) the part of or interest in a deceased husband's property provided to his widow, usually in the form of a life estate.

As a preposition ower

is (geordie) over.

As an adverb ower

is (geordie) over.

As an adjective ower

is (geordie) over, too.

As a verb dower is

to give a dower or dowry.

ower

English

Etymology 1

From the verb to owe .

Noun

(en noun)
  • A person who owes money.
  • Etymology 2

    Colloquial variant of over .

    Preposition

    (English prepositions)
  • (Geordie) over
  • Get ower thor noo!

    Adverb

    (-)
  • (Geordie) over
  • She's ower canny hor, like

    Adjective

    (-)
  • (Geordie) over, too
  • Thats ower much that!

    References

    * * *

    Anagrams

    * ----

    dower

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (legal) The part of or interest in a deceased husband's property provided to his widow, usually in the form of a life estate.
  • (legal) Property given by a groom directly to his bride at or before their wedding in order to legitimize the marriage.
  • * 1610 , , act 3 scene 1
  • (obsolete) That with which one is gifted or endowed; endowment; gift.
  • * Sir J. Davies
  • How great, how plentiful, how rich a dower !
  • * Wordsworth
  • Man in his primeval dower arrayed.

    Antonyms

    * (l) * (l)

    See also

    * (l) * ("dower" on Wikipedia)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To give a dower or dowry.
  • To endow.
  • Anagrams

    *