Dood vs Dook - What's the difference?

dood | dook |


As a proper noun dood

is death; the personification of death.

As a verb dook is

(of a ferret) to make a certain clucking sound or dook can be (dialect) duck.

As a noun dook is

a strong, untwilled linen or cotton.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

dood

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    dook

    English

    Etymology 1

    Onomatopoeic.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (of a ferret) To make a certain clucking sound.
  • Etymology 2

    (duck)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (dialect) duck
  • * 1835 , James Baillie Fraser, The Highland smugglers, Volume 2
  • But anger is a blin' guide — he dooked from the first blow, an' it passed wi' little ill; an' he raised his drawn sword, an' made a wild cut at my head...

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) . See also (l) (cloth).

    Alternative forms

    * (l)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • a strong, untwilled linen or cotton.
  • Derived terms
    * (l) * (l) ----