Doot vs Doit - What's the difference?

doot | doit |


As a verb doot

is (chiefly|scotland) doubt.

As a noun doit is

(historical) a small dutch coin, equivalent to one-eighth of a stiver.

doot

English

Verb

(head)
  • (chiefly, Scotland) doubt
  • * {{quote-book, year=1902, author=Jack London, title=A Daughter of the Snows, chapter=, edition= citation
  • , passage="Mair'd be a bother; an' I doot not ye'll mak' it all richt, lad." }}
  • * {{quote-book, year=1917, author=John Hay Beith, title=All In It: K(1) Carries On, chapter=, edition= citation
  • , passage=No doot he'll try to pass himself off as an officer, for to get better quarters!" }}
  • (chiefly, Scotland) think
  • * {{quote-book, year=1920, author=James C. Welsh, title=The Underworld, chapter=, edition= citation
  • , passage="I think my pipe's on the mantelshelf," returned Geordie, "but I doot it's empty." }}

    Anagrams

    * ----

    doit

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (historical) A small Dutch coin, equivalent to one-eighth of a stiver.
  • * c.'' 1606 , , Act 4, Scene 12:
  • most monster-like, be shown / For poor'st diminutives, for doits ;
  • (archaic) A small amount; a bit, a jot.
  • * 1819 , — Walter Scott, Ivanhoe
  • *:“Speak out, ye Saxon dogs — what bid ye for your worthless lives? — How say you, you of Rotherwood?” “Not a doit I,” answered poor Wamba.
  • * 1610 , , act 2 scene 2
  • When / they will not give a doit to relieve a lame beggar, they / will lay out ten to see a dead Indian.
  • (music) In jazz music, a note that slides to an indefinite pitch chromatically upwards.
  • * 1995 , Music & Computers (volume 1, issues 2-4, page 57)
  • Jazz symbols include many contoured articulations and inflections, such as doits , fall-offs, and scoops.
    ----