Dizzy vs Dizzy - What's the difference?

dizzy | dizzy |


In lang=en terms the difference between dizzy and dizzy

is that dizzy is to make dizzy, to bewilder while dizzy is to make dizzy, to bewilder.

As adjectives the difference between dizzy and dizzy

is that dizzy is having a sensation of whirling, with a tendency to fall; giddy; feeling unbalanced or lightheaded while dizzy is having a sensation of whirling, with a tendency to fall; giddy; feeling unbalanced or lightheaded.

As verbs the difference between dizzy and dizzy

is that dizzy is to make dizzy, to bewilder while dizzy is to make dizzy, to bewilder.

dizzy

English

Alternative forms

* dizzie (obsolete)

Adjective

(er)
  • Having a sensation of whirling, with a tendency to fall; giddy; feeling unbalanced or lightheaded.
  • I stood up too fast and felt dizzy .
  • * Drayton
  • Alas! his brain was dizzy .
  • Producing giddiness.
  • We climbed to a dizzy height.
  • * Macaulay
  • To climb from the brink of Fleet Ditch by a dizzy ladder.
  • * 1918 , (Edgar Rice Burroughs), Chapter IX
  • ...faintly from the valley far below came an unmistakable sound which brought me to my feet, trembling with excitement, to peer eagerly downward from my dizzy ledge.
  • empty-headed, scatterbrained or frivolous
  • My new secretary is a dizzy blonde.
  • * Milton
  • the dizzy multitude

    Derived terms

    * dizzily * dizziness * dizzyingly

    Verb

  • To make dizzy, to bewilder.
  • *, Folio Society, 2006, vol.1, p.161:
  • Let me have this violence and compulsion removed, there is nothing that, in my seeming, doth more bastardise and dizzie a wel-borne and gentle nature.
  • * Sir Walter Scott
  • If the jangling of thy bells had not dizzied thy understanding.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2012, date=September 7, author=Dominic Fifield, work=The Guardian
  • , title= England start World Cup campaign with five-goal romp against Moldova , passage=So ramshackle was the locals' attempt at defence that, with energetic wingers pouring into the space behind panicked full-backs and centre-halves dizzied by England's movement, it was cruel to behold at times. The contest did not extend beyond the half-hour mark.}}

    dizzy

    English

    Alternative forms

    * dizzie (obsolete)

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Having a sensation of whirling, with a tendency to fall; giddy; feeling unbalanced or lightheaded.
  • I stood up too fast and felt dizzy .
  • * Drayton
  • Alas! his brain was dizzy .
  • Producing giddiness.
  • We climbed to a dizzy height.
  • * Macaulay
  • To climb from the brink of Fleet Ditch by a dizzy ladder.
  • * 1918 , (Edgar Rice Burroughs), Chapter IX
  • ...faintly from the valley far below came an unmistakable sound which brought me to my feet, trembling with excitement, to peer eagerly downward from my dizzy ledge.
  • empty-headed, scatterbrained or frivolous
  • My new secretary is a dizzy blonde.
  • * Milton
  • the dizzy multitude

    Derived terms

    * dizzily * dizziness * dizzyingly

    Verb

  • To make dizzy, to bewilder.
  • *, Folio Society, 2006, vol.1, p.161:
  • Let me have this violence and compulsion removed, there is nothing that, in my seeming, doth more bastardise and dizzie a wel-borne and gentle nature.
  • * Sir Walter Scott
  • If the jangling of thy bells had not dizzied thy understanding.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2012, date=September 7, author=Dominic Fifield, work=The Guardian
  • , title= England start World Cup campaign with five-goal romp against Moldova , passage=So ramshackle was the locals' attempt at defence that, with energetic wingers pouring into the space behind panicked full-backs and centre-halves dizzied by England's movement, it was cruel to behold at times. The contest did not extend beyond the half-hour mark.}}