Mind vs Disturb - What's the difference?

mind | disturb |


In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between mind and disturb

is that mind is (obsolete) to put in mind; to remind while disturb is (obsolete) disturbance.

As nouns the difference between mind and disturb

is that mind is the ability for rational thought while disturb is (obsolete) disturbance.

As verbs the difference between mind and disturb

is that mind is (now|regional) to remember while disturb is to confuse a quiet, constant state or a calm, continuous flow, in particular: thoughts, actions or liquids.

mind

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • The ability for rational thought.
  • :
  • The ability to be aware of things.
  • :
  • The ability to remember things.
  • :
  • The ability to focus the thoughts.
  • :
  • Somebody that embodies certain mental qualities.
  • :
  • Judgment, opinion, or view.
  • :
  • Desire, inclination, or intention.
  • :
  • A healthy mental state.
  • :
  • :
  • *
  • *:“[…] it is not fair of you to bring against mankind double weapons ! Dangerous enough you are as woman alone, without bringing to your aid those gifts of mind suited to problems which men have been accustomed to arrogate to themselves.”
  • (lb) The non-material substance or set of processes in which consciousness, perception, affectivity, judgement, thinking, and will are based.
  • :
  • *1699 , , Heads designed for an essay on conversations
  • *:Study gives strength to the mind ; conversation, grace: the first apt to give stiffness, the other suppleness: one gives substance and form to the statue, the other polishes it.
  • *1854 , Samuel Knaggs, Unsoundness of Mind Considered in Relation to the Question of Responsibility for Criminal Acts , p.19:
  • *:The mind is that part of our being which thinks and wills, remembers and reasons; we know nothing of it except from these functions.
  • *1883 , (Howard Pyle), (The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood)
  • *:Thus they dwelled for nearly a year, and in that time Robin Hood often turned over in his mind many means of making an even score with the Sheriff.
  • *, chapter=7
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=

    Synonyms

    * (ability for rational thought) brain, head, intellect, intelligence, nous, psyche, reason, wit * (ability to be aware of things) awareness, consciousness, sentience * (ability to remember things) memory, recollection * (ability to focus the thoughts) attention, concentration, focus * (somebody that embodies certain mental qualities) genius, intellectual, thinker * judgment, judgement, idea, opinion, view * desire, disposition, idea, inclination, intention, mood * (healthy mental state) sanity * (process of ): cognition, learning

    Derived terms

    * aftermind * amind * bear in mind * be of one mind * blow someone's mind * breadth of mind * change one's mind * come to mind * foremind * give someone a piece of one's mind * have a mind like a sieve * have a mind of one's own * have in mind * hivemind * in one's right mind * Jedi mind tricks * know one's own mind * lose one's mind * make up one's mind * meeting of the minds * mind's ear * mind's eye * mind-blowing * mindboggling * mindful * mindless * month's mind * of one mind * of two minds * out of one's mind * overmind * philosophy of mind * presence of mind * put someone in mind of * read someone's mind * right-minded * spring to mind * to my mind * top of mind * undermind * year's mind

    See also

    * (wikipedia)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (now, regional) To remember.
  • * 1896 , , (A Shropshire Lad), XXXVII, lines 25-26:
  • The land where I shall mind you not / Is the land where all's forgot.
  • You should mind your own business.
  • * Addison
  • bidding him be a good child, and mind his book
  • (originally and chiefly in negative or interrogative constructions) To dislike, to object to; to be bothered by.
  • I wouldn't mind an ice cream right now.
  • (now, chiefly, North America, Ireland) To pay attention to; to listen attentively to, to obey.
  • * 2000 , (George RR Martin), A Storm of Swords , Bantam 2011, page 84:
  • ‘Should you ever have a son, Sansa, beat him frequently so he learns to mind you.’
  • To pay attention to (something); to keep one's mind on.
  • * Shakespeare
  • My lord, you nod: you do not mind the play.
  • To look after, to take care of, especially for a short period of time.
  • Would you mind my bag for me?
  • (chiefly, in the imperative) To make sure, to take care ((that)).
  • Mind you don't knock that glass over.
  • To be careful about.
  • * 2005 , Gillie Bolton, Reflective Practice: Writing And Professional Development , ISBN 9781848602120, page xv:
  • Bank Underground Station, London, is built on a curve, leaving a potentially dangerous gap between platform and carriage to trap the unwary. The loudspeaker voice instructs passengers to "Mind the gap": the boundary between train and platform.
  • (obsolete) To have in mind; to intend.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I mind to tell him plainly what I think.
    (Beaconsfield)
  • (obsolete) To put in mind; to remind.
  • * Fuller
  • He minded them of the mutability of all earthly things.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I do thee wrong to mind thee of it.

    Derived terms

    * mind one's p's and q's * mind the store

    Statistics

    * 1000 English basic words ----

    disturb

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • to confuse a quiet, constant state or a calm, continuous flow, in particular: thoughts, actions or liquids.
  • The noisy ventilation disturbed me during the exam.
    The performance was disturbed twice by a ringing mobile phone.
    A school of fish disturbed the water.
  • to divert, redirect, or alter by disturbing.
  • A mudslide disturbed the course of the river.
    The trauma disturbed his mind.
  • * Milton
  • disturb his inmost counsels from their destined aim
  • to have a negative emotional impact; to cause emotional distress or confusion.
  • A disturbing film that tries to explore the mind of a serial killer.
    His behaviour is very disturbing .

    Derived terms

    * disturbance

    Noun

  • (obsolete) disturbance
  • (Milton)