Distance vs Distinctive - What's the difference?

distance | distinctive |


As an adjective distinctive is

that serves to distinguish between things.

distance

Alternative forms

* (l) (archaic)

Noun

  • (lb) The amount of space between two points, usually geographical points, usually (but not necessarily) measured along a straight line.
  • :
  • *, chapter=5
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Then everybody once more knelt, and soon the blessing was pronounced. The choir and the clergy trooped out slowly,
  • Length or interval of time.
  • *(Matthew Prior) (1664-1721)
  • *:ten years' distance between one and the other
  • *(John Playfair) (1748-1819)
  • *:the writings of Euclid at the distance of two thousand years
  • The difference; the subjective measure between two quantities.
  • :
  • Remoteness of place; a remote place.
  • *(Washington Irving) (1783-1859)
  • *:easily managed from a distance
  • * (1777-1844)
  • *:'Tis distance lends enchantment to the view.
  • *(Joseph Addison) (1672–1719)
  • *:[He] waits at distance till he hears from Cato.
  • Remoteness in succession or relation.
  • :
  • A space marked out in the last part of a racecourse.
  • *(w, Roger L'Estrange) (1616-1704)
  • *:the horse that ran the whole field out of distance
  • The entire amount of progress to an objective.
  • :
  • A withholding of intimacy; alienation; variance.
  • :
  • *(Francis Bacon) (1561-1626)
  • *:Setting them [factions] at distance , or at least distrust amongst themselves.
  • *(John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • *:On the part of Heaven, / Now alienated, distance and distaste.
  • *
  • *:In former days every tavern of repute kept such a room for its own select circle, a club, or society, of habitués, who met every evening, for a pipe and a cheerful glass.Strangers might enter the room, but they were made to feel that they were there on sufferance: they were received with distance and suspicion.
  • The remoteness or reserve which respect requires; hence, respect; ceremoniousness.
  • *(John Dryden) (1631-1700)
  • *:I hope your modesty / Will know what distance to the crown is due.
  • *(Francis Atterbury) (1663-1732)
  • *:'Tis by respect and distance that authority is upheld.
  • Synonyms

    *

    Derived terms

    * aesthetic distance * angular distance * automatic distance control * braking distance * Cartesian distance * critical distance * distance formula * distance learning * distance vision * distancer * edit distance * effort distance * Euclidean distance * focal distance * go the distance * Hamming distance * horizon distance * interarch distance * interplant distance * keep at a distance * keep one's distance * Levenshtein distance * long-distance * luminosity distance * mean distance between failure * middle-distance * polar distance * resistance distance * self-distance * short-distance * skip distance * social distance * spitting distance * striking distance * string distance * taxicab distance * walking distance * zenith distance

    Verb

  • To move away (from) someone or something.
  • He distanced himself from the comments made by some of his colleagues.
  • To leave at a distance; to outpace, leave behind.
  • * 1891 , Mary Noailles Murfree, In the "Stranger People's" Country , Nebraska 2005, p. 71:
  • Then the horse, with muscles strong as steel, distanced the sound.

    Statistics

    *

    distinctive

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • that serves to distinguish between things
  • that is characteristic or typical of something