Vary vs Distinct - What's the difference?

vary | distinct |


In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between vary and distinct

is that vary is (obsolete) alteration; change while distinct is (obsolete) marked; variegated.

As a verb vary

is to change with time or a similar parameter.

As a noun vary

is (obsolete) alteration; change.

As an adjective distinct is

capable of being perceived very clearly.

vary

English

Verb

(en-verb)
  • To change with time or a similar parameter.
  • He varies his magic tricks so as to minimize the possibility that any given audience member will see the same trick twice.
  • To institute a change in, from a current state; to modify.
  • You should vary your diet. Eating just bread will do you harm in the end.
  • * Waller
  • Gods, that never change their state, / Vary oft their love and hate.
  • * Dryden
  • We are to vary the customs according to the time and country where the scene of action lies.
  • Not to remain constant: to change with time or a similar parameter.
  • His mood varies by the hour.
    The sine function varies between &
  • x2212;1 and 1.
  • * Addison
  • While fear and anger, with alternate grace, / Pant in her breast, and vary in her face.
  • (of the members of a group) To display differences.
  • ''The sprouting tendency of potatoes varies between cultivars, years and places of growing.
  • To be or act different from the usual.
  • I'm not comfortable with 3.Nc3 in the Caro-Kann, so I decided to vary and play exd5.
  • To make of different kinds; to make different from one another; to diversity; to variegate.
  • * Sir Thomas Browne
  • God hath varied their inclinations.
  • * Milton
  • God hath here / Varied his bounty so with new delights.
  • (music) To embellish; to change fancifully; to present under new aspects, as of form, key, measure, etc. See variation .
  • (obsolete) To disagree; to be at variance or in dissension.
  • * Webster (1623)
  • the rich jewel which we vary for

    Noun

    (-)
  • (obsolete) Alteration; change.
  • (Shakespeare)

    Anagrams

    * ----

    distinct

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Capable of being perceived very clearly.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=July-August, author= Fenella Saunders
  • , title= Tiny Lenses See the Big Picture, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=The single-imaging optic of the mammalian eye offers some distinct visual advantages. Such lenses can take in photons from a wide range of angles, increasing light sensitivity. They also have high spatial resolution, resolving incoming images in minute detail.}}
  • Different from one another (with the preferable adposition being "from").
  • * {{quote-book, year=1928, author=Lawrence R. Bourne, title=Well Tackled!
  • , chapter=13 citation , passage=“Yes, there are two distinct sets of footprints, both wearing rubber shoes—one I think ordinary plimsolls, the other goloshes,” replied the sergeant.}}
  • Noticeably different from others; distinctive.
  • Separate in place; not conjunct or united; with from .
  • * Clarendon
  • The intention was that the two armies which marched out together should afterward be distinct .
  • (obsolete) Distinguished; having the difference marked; separated by a visible sign; marked out; specified.
  • * Milton
  • Wherever thus created — for no place / Is yet distinct by name.
  • (obsolete) Marked; variegated.
  • * Spenser
  • The which [place] was dight / With divers flowers distinct with rare delight.

    Synonyms

    * prominent * separate * several (in dated sense)

    Antonyms

    * indistinct * (capable of being perceived very clearly) confusing * (different from one another) same